Courses

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ARAB/ARAL 101 Arabic I: An Introduction to the Arabic Language

3 credits; 3 class hours; 1 lab hour
 
This course will provide students with an introduction to the Arabic language. Students will learn to read and write in the Arabic script and study basic grammar of the modern standard Arabic language. They will also acquire knowledge of Arab culture through the study of the language and basic colloquial conversation skills. Pre-requisite: None

FREN/ FREL 101 Beginning French I (closed to francophone speakers)

3 credits; 3 class hours; 1 lab hour
 
An introduction to the French language as a medium of communication, it will focus on the oral use of the language with work also in written drills, grammar and composition. One hour weekly attendance in the Language Laboratory is required. Not open to native speakers of French or students with francophone proficiency. Pre-requisite: None Co-requisite: FREL 101

FREN/FREL 102 Beginning French II (closed to francophone speakers)

3 credits; 3 class hours; 1 lab hour
 
A continuation of the materials covered in FREN 101. One hour weekly attendance in the Language Laboratory is required. Not open to native speakers of French or students with francophone proficiency. Pre-requisite: FREN 101 or Permission of Chairperson Co-requisite: FREL 102

FREN 201 Intermediate French I

3 credits; 3 class hours; 1 lab hour
 
This course is aimed at native francophone speakers who need formal language instruction and non-native students who demonstrate a satisfactory degree of proficiency. The study of a graded series of texts will constitute the basis of both textual analysis and the students' practice of communication skills. A comprehensive review of grammar will stress the morphology and use of the verb paradigm. Class and language-lab exercises will emphasize audio oral interaction and writing.  Students will be expected to have the capacity to speak, read and write in standard French with originality about the topics studied in class. Pre-requisite: FREN 102 and FREL 102. Open to native speakers of French; Passing grade on placement test; recommendation of faculty after successful completion of FREN 102.

FREN 202 Intermediate French II

3 credits; 3 class hours; 1 lab hour
 
This course will teach students to perceive the language as a vehicle for culture. A broad range of texts in French will be read and discussed and will serve as linguistic models and as a basis for thematic discussion and composition. The study on texts of culture will be intensified. Literary texts, as well as films and texts dealing with current cultural and social activity in the francophone countries in the Americas, will be studied. Pre-requisite: FREN 201 or Permission of Chairperson

FREN 216 Reading and Writing Literary Texts

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This new course, entirely taught in French, is aimed at students who already completed the intermediate level and who wish to reinforce and develop their aural comprehension, oral proficiency and writing skills. The course has cultural and literary content that covers not only productions from France but also from French speaking countries, especially from Africa and the Caribbean. Students will be exposed to short videos, films, short stories and text-readings selected from the course textbooks and/or from the international press written in French. They will discuss material in class and then write short analytical essays on a particular topic. Written works will be drafted, discussed and reviewed in class until a satisfying version is obtained. The discussion and edition process will also apply to oral presentations made individually or in pair on selected topics. Although a review of certain key topics in grammar (particularly the verb paradigm, including aspect and mode) will be done systematically, most of the theoretical work on language will focus on students writing competency. Pre-requisite: French 202. Four semesters of college French, four years of high school French (with a B average or better), or Permission of chairperson.

FREN 250 French and Francophone Culture in Paris

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
French and Francophone culture in Paris is the cultural part of our study abroad program in Paris. It is a customized course that has been created in the context of the study abroad to emphasize culture by the means of having students actively involved in a research project that will be undertaken before during and after their stay in Paris. Students enrolled in this course will have the possibility to choose a topic in one of the following French areas: Anthropology, History, Literature, Performing arts, Visual arts and any other discipline considered under a cultural angle. Pre-requisite: French 101 & 102 or Permission of chairperson

PORT/PORL 101 Portuguese I: An Introduction to the Portuguese Language

3 credits; 3 class hours; 1 lab hour
 
This course offers an introduction to the Portuguese language. It will focus on the development of the basic modalities of speaking, listening, reading and writing. It is also an introduction to the Lusophone world and to the Portuguese spoken in Brazil. This course will be in Portuguese and requires the student use of the language. Communication skills such as grammar, composition, and oral comprehension of simple language structures will be developed supplemented by exposure to other material in basic Portuguese. Pre-requisite: None

PORT 102 Beginning Portuguese II

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is the second semester of the beginning sequence in Portuguese (PORT 101 & 102). It is intended to continue to develop the basic communication skills introduced at the previous level and is designed to give students an ability to actively communicate in Portuguese using all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The emphasis will be on basic oral expression and listening comprehension and is reflected in all our classroom activities. This course takes a highly interactive approach towards presentation and practice of the language while integrating cultural information and exchange. Pre-requisite: PORT 101

SPAN/SPAL 101 Beginning Spanish (closed to Spanish speakers)

3 credits; 3 class hours; 1 lab hour
 
This course is an introduction to the Spanish language as a medium of communication, it will focus on the oral use of the language with work also in written drills, grammar and composition. One hour weekly attendance in the Language Laboratory is required. Closed to native speakers of Spanish. Pre-requisite: None Co-requisite: SPAL 101

SPAN/SPAL 102 Beginning Spanish II (closed to Spanish speakers)

3 credits; 3 class hours; 1 lab hour
 
This course is a continuation of the materials covered in SPAN 101. One hour weekly attendance in the Language Laboratory is required. Pre-requisites: SPAN 101 and SPAL 101 or Permission of chairperson Co-requisite: SPAL 102

SPAN 151 Spanish for Bilingual, General and Special Education Students I

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This is an introductory course on theory and practice of the language designed to prepare students in the Bilingual Education Programs to perform their future professional duties effectively in Spanish. The content and materials of the course will cover a variety of academic subjects as well as the language itself. Students will read, comment and write on a broad range of texts that will include major themes of the literature, music, arts, humanities and history of Latin America and Latino culture. Critical analysis of both discourse and content of class materials will prepare students to write well reasoned responses. The mechanics of reading and writing as well as the organization of student compositions will receive special attention. An effort will be made to study grammar using the students' own compositions to insure that the basics of orthography, morphology and syntax are learned. Pre-requisite: The course will be open to students who pass the placement test provided by the foreign language faculty.

SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I

3 credits; 3 class hours; 1 lab hour
 
This course is a continuation and completion of the study of materials covered in SPAN 101 and 102. Selected reading of modern texts. One hour weekly attendance in the Learning Laboratory is required. Pre-requisite: SPAN 102 or Challenge Examination Department of Foreign Languages Medgar Evers College, CUNY . 123

SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II

3 credits; 3 class hours; 1 lab hour
 
This course is a continuation of SPAN 201. Emphasis will be on analysis, discussion, and composition based on the reading of selected texts as an introduction to specialized literature courses. Pre-requisite: SPAN 201 or Challenge Examination

SPAN 203 Spanish for Native Speakers I

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is a review of pronunciation, spelling, and selected aspects of the grammar that present special difficulties to the native speaker. This course is designed for students who have a good command of the spoken language but have had little or no formal instruction. Pre-requisite: Permission of chairperson

SPAN 204 Spanish for Native Speakers II

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
SPAN 203 and 204 are a sequence. In SPAN 204, the student continues the study of the materials introduced in SPAN 203. Upon completion of both courses, the student will have acquired the basic skills needed to use his/her native language effectively and to proceed to major-level course work. Pre-requisite: SPAN 203 or by Permission of chairperson

SPAN 206 Introduction to Hispanic Literature

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course will explore the origins of Hispanic literature. Literary forms and movements, collective attitudes and creative approaches will be discussed in order to arrive at the basis for Spanish and Spanish-American literature and culture. Representative works will be read, analyzed, and discussed. The course will be conducted entirely in Spanish. Required for more advanced literature courses. Pre-requisite: SPAN 202 or by Permission of chairperson

SPAN 213 Conversation and Writing

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This is a course designed to develop aural comprehension, oral proficiency and writing skills of students with intermediate knowledge of Spanish. Students will prepare and make oral presentations on a variety of current topics on the basis of short videos, films, and text-readings selected from the course textbook and/or from the New York press written in Spanish. The process of class consideration and discussion of each topic will help students write drafts and compositions which, in turn, will be material of discussion and editing in class. Although a review of certain key grammar topics (particularly the verb paradigm, including aspect and mode) will be done systematically, most of the theoretical work on the language will be made on the basis of the difficulties shown by students' writing. The course will be conducted entirely in Spanish. Pre-requisites: SPAN 202, SPAN 204, four semesters of college Spanish, four years of high school Spanish (with a B average or better), or Permission of chairperson.

SPAN 251 Spanish for Bilingual, General and Special Education Students II

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This is a continuation of SPAN 151. The general goals of SPAN 151 apply to this course. At the end of the course, students are expected to speak, read and write, meeting the language expectations of a standard speaker who is able to understand and use a variety of language forms and styles pertinent to bilingual instruction across a wide range of subjects and levels. Essays on art, music, culture and the social sciences will be studied in class in order to use them for class reading and writing purposes. An effort will be made to include current materials relevant to the Hispanic population of the United States. The study of Latin American literary texts, in particular, will be stressed. Students will use expository prose to write well organized essays that are pedagogically persuasive and free of major grammatical errors. Pre-requisite: SPAN 216 or Permission of chairperson

SPAN 315 Spanish Civilization

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course aims to give students a comprehensive overview of Spanish civilization, including pre-Roman cultures and to consider carefully selected works of art and architecture, music, and literature that have informed the cultural consciousness of generations of Spanish speaking readers. The notions that the multiple identities emerging in modern Spain, with their own languages and cultures, should be carefully considered. All regions essential common historical, social, economic and cultural elements, and that the history and culture of Spain will be studied in the context of the cultural regions that have informed its identity, and constitute the guiding purpose of the course. Pre-requisite: SPAN 216 or Permission of chairperson

SPAN 316 Hispanic-American Civilization

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course aims to give students a comprehensive overview of Latin American civilization, including pre-Columbian cultures and to consider carefully selected works of art and architecture, music, and literature that have informed the cultural consciousness of generations of Latin Americans. The notions that the multiple identities emerging in modern Latin America have essential common historical, social, economic and cultural elements and that they are all multicultural in fundamental ways will guide the study of all topics in this course. Pre-requisite: SPAN 216 or Permission of chairperson

SPAN 320 Spanish-American Short fiction

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
Since the publication of Azul by Rubén Darío, Latin American fiction has taken a leading place in Hispanic and world literature. The decades of the twentieth century that follow Darío, and the rest of the Latin American modernists writers, witnessed and array of extraordinary fiction writers who incorporated European vanguardism into works of fiction that were genuinely Latin American. In this course, some of the most significant short fiction produced between the publication of Darío's masterpiece and the end of the XX century will be studied. Works by Quiroga, Borges, Rulfo, Cortázar, García Márquez and other seminal authors will be considered in the context of the aesthetic, social and cultural movements in which they originated. It is an aim of the course to consider particular texts in relation to the most important theoretical tenets of the genre. Although attention will be paid to scholarly work that will contextualize the study of the selected works in all pertinent respects, the principal goal of the course is to guide students to learn how to perform textual analysis on the basis of careful consideration of selected texts. Pre-requisite: SPAN 216 or Permission of chairperson

SPAN 350 Spanish-American Modernism

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
Special Topics in Spanish Peninsular Literature is an upper level course designed to meet the special needs of upper-level students in the F.L. programs. Its main goal is to offer an in-depth view of an important literary trend, author, genre, or literary generation, in Peninsular Literature. The members of the department have considered the following possibilities as concrete course offerings: Special topics in Poetry of the Middle Ages, Epic Poetry of the Middle Ages, Prose of the Middle Ages, Special topics in Poetry of theGolden Age, Golden Age Theater, The Picaresque Novel, Cervantes: Don Quijote de la Mancha, Nineteenth Century Novel, Galdós: Fiction, Poetry and Theater of the Generación del 98, Poetry of the Generalción del 27, Peninsular contemporary fiction. Prerequisite: SPAN 216 or Permission of chairperson
 

SPAN 351 Spanish Poetry of the Golden Age

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course will analyze and help students to develop a comprehensive understanding of the "Modernista" movement, whose aesthetic and philosophical principles were dominant throughout the literature of the Hispanic world at the end of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth. "Modernismo" was primarily concerned with reforming poetic language and experimenting with rhythm, meter, and imagery. Its principles, however, also influenced narrative fiction, fictional prose and the theatre. We will study the most important manifestations of this renovation through the close reading and analysis of Spanish American writers, with special emphasis on José Martí, the precursor of the movement and Rubén Darío, its guiding force. Pre-requisite: SPAN 216 or Permission of chairperson