Courses

EDUC 100 Parent/Teacher-Child Interaction

2 credits; 2 class hours
 
This course is designed to create an awareness of parental involvement in education informally and formally throughout the 19th and 20th century. Briefly, the course will cover the history of parental involvement in the United States and examine structured parent programs. The course will also explore effective techniques and approaches utilized by parents to support their children in school. The course is open to teachers and parents. Pre/Co-requisite: ENGL 112

EDUC 102 Introduction to the World of the Learner

2 credits; 3 class hours
 
This introductory course explores the many institutions that make an impact on the child's total development. Prospective teachers will examine how social institutions such as the home, school, church, community, media, and technology affect the child's learning. The concept of the self and other personality characteristics that affect the interaction between children and adults will be examined. These courses take an inclusive approach to educating students with special abilities. Diversity will be explored through pluralistic lenses affording students the opportunity to make cross-cultural connections. Technology will be examined as a tool to better inform students' future teaching and learning in urban settings. Classroom management strategies will be explored. Supervised field experiences are a major component of this course. Pre-requisite: Students must have 24-30 credits in the Liberal Arts Core courses prior to registering for this course. Exemptions considered with permission of the Chair./Co-requisite: EDUC 501

EDUC 103 School Community Relations

2 credits; 2 class hours
 
This course is designed to help a prospective teacher develop awareness and understanding of the community in which he/she teaches. It focuses on the involvement of the community in the educational process. The areas of concentration are comprised of pupil-community involvement, parent-pupil relationships, and parent teacher relationships offered periodically. Pre-requisite: None

EDUC 110 Health, Safety Fitness for Teachers

1 credit; 1.5 class hours
 
This course will provide prospective teachers with the necessary knowledge and skills to establish and maintain personal health and fitness, to create and maintain safe and healthy home and classroom environments, and use their knowledge of personal and community health issues to effectively manage their resources and to advocate for healthy children, families and communities. This course will consist of a series of seven two-hour workshops on the following issues of health and safety:
  1. nutrition;
  2. exercise and physical fitness;
  3. sexuality, health and hygiene;
  4. prevention and risk education strategies to promote safety at home and in the classroom, including prevention of child abduction;
  5. identification and reporting of suspected child abuse and maltreatment;
  6. fire and arson prevention, and
  7. the impact of alcohol, and substance abuse on personal health and families.
Pre-requisite: ENGL 112

EDUC 152 Introduction to Special Education

2 credits; 3 class hours
 
The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the field of special education and the needs of exceptional children and youth who are gifted or have impairments that affect intellectual, physical, emotional or sensory abilities. The student will develop an understanding of the developmental and learning characteristics of exceptional children and youth and learn about various educational services that have been found to be effective in enabling exceptional children and youth to meet their potential. Pre-requisite: Students must have 24-30 credits in the Liberal Arts Core courses prior to registering for this course. Exemptions considered with permission of the Chair/Co-requisite: EDUC 502

EDUC 200 History and Foundations of Bilingual General and Bilingual Special Education

2 credits; 2 class hours
 
This introductory course provides an historical overview of major areas integral to bilingual general education and bilingual special education students and programs. Review of the history and major development of the program in the United States will be presented. Legal, cultural, linguistic, programmatic, advocacy and assessment issues will be reviewed. Theoretical readings will be matched with practical, field-based classroom visits and interviews with teachers and parents. Pre-requisite: ENGL 150

EDUC 203 Introduction to Developmental Disabilities (formerly EDUC 153)

2 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is designed to provide students with a survey of the various developmental disabilities. The behavioral characteristics; educational and vocational needs; and adaptive skills of persons diagnosed as developmentally disabled will be emphasized. The course will address the medical, developmental, psychosocial issues affecting individuals with developmental disabilities. Diagnostic and assessment methods will be discussed. The course will address the application of instructional technologies in the education and treatment of persons with developmental disabilities and methods for including them in all facets of the community. This course includes a supervised field placement. Pre-requisite: EDUC 203 and ENGL 150 and Admission to BA Program at the Professional level or permission of the chairperson.

EDUC 231 Child Development

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course examines the physical, social, intellectual and emotional aspects of child development, the interrelationships among them, and their influence on the child's learning experiences from birth to adolescence. The prospective teacher will develop awareness of developmental norms, individual differences and an understanding of approaches to working with all children in order to enhance their school success. Pre-requisites: Students must have 24-30 credits in the Liberal Arts Core courses prior to registering for this course. Exemptions considered with permission of the Chair/ Co-requisite: EDUC 503

EDUC 252 Principles of Early Intervention: Needs of Infants, Toddlers and Children with Developmental Disabilities

2 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is designed to facilitate students' acquisition and demonstration of knowledge and skills about the special needs of toddlers, infants and children from birth to seven years of age with special needs. The course will explore cognitive, language and neuro-motor development; and related medical and psychosocial issues. Students will learn various strategies for including infants and toddlers with special needs in regular settings and the uses of instructional technologies and devices. Students will practice developing IFSPs/ IEPs and related instructional goals and activities. Family-centered intervention and collaboration and the roles and responsibilities of professionals will be examined. This course includes a supervised field placement. Pre-requisite: EDUC 152 Pre/Co-requisite: ENGL 112

EDUC 253 Assessment, Treatment and Services for Infants, Toddlers and Children with Developmental Disabilities

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is designed to help students critically examine the purposes, practices, policies, problems, and trends in assessing children birth to seven years of age who are suspected of a having a developmental delay or are at risk for delay. Students will examine and familiarize themselves with a variety of assessment instruments and techniques. Strategies for conducting family-centered and trans disciplinary assessments in natural environments will be explored. Students will analyze the relationship of assessment to the: cultural and familial context of the child; theories of teaching and learning; and instructional planning. Students will practice developing IFSPs/IEPs and instructional goals and activities. The course emphasizes the importance of and strategies for including children with special needs in regular education settings and the uses of instructional technologies in teaching. The roles and responsibilities of assessment and service professionals will be emphasized. The course includes a supervised field experience. Pre-requisite: EDUC 252 Pre/Co-requisite: EDUC 509

EDUC 301 Principles of Early Childhood Education

2 credits; 3 class hours
 
The course content gives a comprehensive view of the total field of early childhood education. Theories of child development are reviewed as a basis for examining early childhood principles, practices and programs. This course emphasizes the child's development of concepts, relationships, and positive attitudes toward self and achievement. This course covers the sociological, philosophical, and historical roles of education in the lives of young children from ages 0-8 in classrooms. Ways of fostering effective relationships and interactions to support growth and learning among varying communities will be examined. The parent as first teacher and the home-school continuum will be explored. An inclusion approach to educating students with special needs in diverse, pluralistic learning communities will be explored. Technology will be used as a tool to design strategies to engage students in self reflection and learning. Supervised field experiences are a required component of this course. Pre-requisite: ENGL 150

EDUC 302 Curriculum and Instruction in Early Childhood Education

2 credits; 2 class hours
 
This methods course explores curriculum theory, resources and recent innovations in early childhood education in urban settings. Strategies to motivate and resolve conflicts will be examined. Inclusive approaches for children with special abilities, diverse populations and technological advances will be explored providing the best practice in the field. Students will develop, design and implement age appropriate curriculum. Supervised field experiences are a major component of this course. Pre-requisite: Admission to the BA Program; Co-requisite:EDUC 507, EDUC 481, EDUC 491

EDUC 307 Foundations of Educational Psychology

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course presents the essentials of educational psychology applicable to teaching and learning situations. Topics for practical application in the classroom are background, development, learning, motivation, evaluation, and individual differences and adjustments. Pre-requisites: Admission to BA Program, ENGL 150 and PSYC 101 and EDUC 231
Department of Education Medgar Evers College, CUNY . 107

EDUC 308 Foundations of Educational Psychology: Middle Childhood

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course examines theories of learning processes, motivation, communication and classroom management, and the application of those theories and understandings in middle childhood classrooms to stimulate and sustain diverse students' interest, cooperation and achievement to each student's highest level of learning in preparation for productive work, continuing growth and citizenship in a democracy. Pre-requisite: None

EDUC 310 Students with Behavior Disorders

2 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is designed for prospective teachers of children and youth with behavior disorders and for teachers who encounter children with these disabilities. The course will critically examine the premises and issues regarding the education of emotionally troubled children. It will present and explore teaching techniques that respond to the needs of children and youth with behavior disorders. This course takes an inclusive approach in responding to the needs of students with exceptional behavior. Attention will be given to strategies and techniques that provide successful experiences for these students in inclusive classroom settings. All students will be required to demonstrate computer/technology skills in completing assignments. This course includes a supervised field experience. Pre-requisites: Admission into the BA Program, EDUC 152 and EDUC 307

EDUC 311 Teaching Elementary Reading I

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
EDUC 311 is designed to introduce students to reading theories as they apply to elementary classrooms from pre-K to grades 4-6. Students will study and critique various approaches to the teaching of reading, from direct phonics instruction to whole language, in order to develop their own balanced approaches to the teaching and learning of reading. Methods and materials for teaching and learning reading, current issues and recent developments in the field will be stressed. Demonstrations and applications of strategies, such as Interactive Reading and Teaching Phonics in Context, will provide practical experiences for students in the course. Students will be required to conduct three classroom observations where they will reflect critically on the connections between the observed phenomena and what they are learning in the course. Students will develop and draft a Statement of Philosophy for the Teaching and Learning of Reading. Pre-requisite: Admission into the BA Program Co-requisite: EDUC 315 Pre/Co-requisite: EDUC 505

EDUC 312 Teaching Elementary Reading II

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course builds on the knowledge acquired in EDUC 311 and is designed to develop the student's mastery of variety of approaches to the teaching of reading. Language arts and literature are integrated throughout the program. Field based experiences emphasize assessment of children's reading skills by Education 312 students and the use of instructional methods and materials designed to meet the needs of children. Supervised field experiences and 3 formal classroom field observations are a required component of this course. Co-requisite: EDUC 505

EDUC 314 Teaching Elementary Social Studies

2 credits; 3 class hours
 
Students will examine national and state standards, curriculum development, instructional planning, assessment and multiple research-validated instructional strategies for teaching social studies to elementary school pupils within the full range of abilities. Students will demonstrate skills in accommodating various learning styles, perspectives and individual differences to enhance the learning of all pupils. The urban community, including its residents and cultural institutions, will be examined as an educational resource for teaching history, geography, economics, government, citizenship, culture and social interaction in a diverse society. The relationships between effective instructional planning, pupil engagement in learning and classroom management will be examined. Use of technology for instruction and administrative purposes will be addressed. Students will use and review software and online educational resources and use electronic mail to communicate with the instructor and for submitting some assignments. This course requires a supervised field placement. Pre-requisite: Admission into the BA Program Co-requisite: EDUC 506

EDUC 315 Teaching Elementary Mathematics

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is designed to explore topics in mathematics for children from birth through sixth grade. Prospective teachers will study and experience a constructivist approach to teaching mathematics. Methods for establishing mathematical concepts and guiding students into mastering the Associated skills algorithms and applications through problem solving and reasoning will be established. The course will focus on developing an active student centered approach to teaching and learning mathematics. Methods of assessing individual teaching practices and student learning for use in curriculum development and instructional planning will be emphasized. This course includes a required field experience component in an early childhood or elementary classroom. Topics that affect the way we teach and learn will be addressed within the context of the impact of classroom interaction. Issues of gender, ethnicity, special needs and classroom management will be incorporated in an on-going discussion of understanding the learner. New York State Curriculum Standards and New York City Performance Standards will provide the basis for curriculum, lesson planning, and assessment. This course requires a supervised field placement. Students will observe mathematics classes in local elementary schools and will participate in tutoring activities to create a forum for examining theory. Pre-requisite: Admission into the BA Program Co-requisite: EDUC 311 Pre/Co-requisite: EDUC 505

EDUC 317 Teaching Elementary Science

2 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is designed to explore topics in science for children from birth through sixth grade. Prospective teachers will study and experience various approaches to teaching science. Methods for establishing science concepts and guiding students in methods of scientific inquiry through experimentation and problem solving will be established. The course will focus on developing an active student centered approach to teaching and learning science. Methods of assessing individual teaching practices and student learning for use in curriculum development and instructional planning will be emphasized. This course includes a required field experience component in an early childhood or elementary classroom. Topics that affect the way we teach and learn will be addressed within the context of the impact of classroom interaction. Issues of gender, ethnicity, special needs and classroom management will be incorporated in an on-going discussion of understanding the learner. New York State Curriculum Standards and New York City Performance Standards will provide the basis for curriculum, lesson planning and assessment. This course requires a supervised field placement. Students will observe science classes in local elementary schools and will participate in tutoring activities to create a forum for examining theory and practice. Co-requisites: EDUC 312 and 381 and 506 Pre/Co-requisite: EDUC 311

EDUC 340 Assessment in Education

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is designed to help students critically examine the purposes, practices, policies, and problems of assessment in education. Assessment will be examined as an inclusive process, which includes, but is not limited to, observation, anecdotal notes, testing, pupil portfolios, authentic problem solving, and conferring with other stakeholders in pupils' development. Students will analyze the relationship of assessment to theories of teaching and learning, curriculum development and performance standards, accountability and policies, instructional planning and delivery, action research, and reflective practice. Students will also examine modes of assessment, including the use of technology in developing, administering and scoring assessment instruments and reporting results of assessment. Students will analyze the effects of assessment practices and policies on pupils, respecting the universal and individual characteristics of development, including issues related to culture, language, race, gender, class, and disabilities. Students will also demonstrate knowledge and skills in the following areas: history of educational testing and measurements, item analysis and interpretations of test scores (including but not limited to statistical analyses), purposes and limits of testing in assessment, and developing and using formal and informal assessment practices for educational decision-making and self-assessment. Pre-requisites: EDUC 231 and PSYC 101 Co-requisite: EDUC 508

EDUC 350 Computers in Education

2 credits, 3 hours
 
This survey course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to integrate computer technology into classroom curriculum. Students will design computer-mediated lessons and projects that will reflect the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to effectively use computers in teaching. They will learn to access electronic resources and effectively incorporate them into the academic curriculum. Methods of evaluating instructional hardware, software, and interactive technology will be examined. Current technology use will be observed in local schools to provide a forum for examining theory and practice. Topics that affect the way we teach and learn will be addresses within the context of child and adolescent development and classroom interaction. Issues of gender, ethnicity, special needs and classroom management will be incorporated in an on-going discussion of understanding the learner. New York State Curriculum Standards and New York City Performance Standards will provide the basis for curriculum, lesson planning and assessment. This course requires a supervised field placement. Pre-requisites: Students must have 24-30 credits in the Liberal Arts Core courses prior to registering for this course. Exemptions considered with permission of the Chair /Co-requisite: EDUC 504

EDUC 353 Structuring the Multi-Cultural Classroom for Academic Success

3 credits, 3 hours
 
This introductory course utilizes various multi-cultural educational settings to expose the teacher-in-training to children and youth from other cultures. For example, students will visit neighborhoods in Chinatown, Brighton Beach, Spanish Harlem, Central Brooklyn, Flatbush and Bay Ridge, and they will observe the dress, stores, foods, etc., of the people that make up the community. They will then move into the schools and observe classroom interactions and the curricula. The purpose is to discover how cultural diversity is reflected and addressed in the school environment. Pre-requisites: PSYC 101 Pre/Co-requisite: ENGL 112

EDUC 355 Critical Issues in the History of Education

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course examines the centrality of race, class, ethnicity and gender in defining the American educational experience. The class will examine four historical periods: Colonial America, the 1840's and the Common School Movement, Reconstruction and the Progressive Era. Current issues like community control, tracking, religion and education, racial and sexual harassment, integration and equitable funding of schools will be examined in terms of their roots in these historical periods and in terms of their relationship to issues of race, ethnicity, gender and class. Students will become familiar with historical research methodology as they examine and analyze particular issues in the history of education. Pre/Co-requisite:
ENGL 150 Department of Education Medgar Evers College, CUNY . 109

EDUC 381 Methods and Materials for Teaching Children with Reading Disabilities

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course will study a variety of disorders in which there is reading retardation or deficiency. It will include organization of activities and materials, selection of equipment, use of medical and guidance services, counseling of parents and case conferences, field observations, and demonstrations of selected methods, practices in planning remedial instructional programs for classes, hospitals, day care centers, institutions, community agencies and home bound instructional settings. Pre-requisites: Admission into BA Program and EDUC 311 Co-requisite: EDUC 312 and EDUC 506

EDUC 457 Research Seminar

2 credits; 2 class hours
 
This course will focus on analyzing curriculum and conceptualizing and designing curriculum for children in grades 1 through 6. Candidates will use classroom observation techniques to analyze curriculum content, structures, and schedules in classrooms. Candidates will align New York City, New York State, and content professional organization standards for learning with curriculum design goals. The observations coupled with a working knowledge of curriculum/content standards will serve as the basis for understanding new approaches to curriculum design, content and structures, particularly the integration of curriculum content through themes, issues, and/or disciplines. Candidates will conceptualize, design, and develop thematic units that reflect content learning standards, supported by a theoretical rationale serving as a framework for creating lesson plans and student plan for one-week integrated curriculum unit. Pre-requisite: Entrance to the BA Program professional level. Co-requisite(s): EDUC 481, EDUC 491, EDUC 507

EDUC 481 Clinical Practice Seminar I

1 credit; 2 class hours
 
This seminar provides the setting for the analytical exploration of experiences acquired in the EDUC 491 senior level student teaching. In the seminar, students will discuss their classroom experiences, their teaching roles and responsibilities, problems of teaching methodology and planning, classroom management problems, challenge of implementing inclusion and integrating technology, etc. Pre-requisite: Formal Acceptance into clinical practice; EDUC 312, EDUC 381, EDUC 301, EDUC 314 or EDUC 317, EDUC 506/ Corequisites:EDUC 491;EDUC 507; EDUC 302 or EDUC 457)

EDUC 482 Clinical Practice Seminar II

1 credit; 2 class hours
 
The second seminar provides the setting for the analytical exploration of experiences acquired in the EDUC 491 senior level student teaching. In the seminar, students will discuss their classroom experiences, their teaching roles and responsibilities, problems of teaching methodology and planning, classroom management problems, challenges of implementing inclusion and integrating technology, etc. Pre-requisites: EDUC 457 or EDUC 302; EDUC 481; EDUC 491; EDUC 507 (with a grade of C or higher) /Co-requisite: EDUC 491; EDUC 507; EDUC 302 or EDUC 457

EDUC 491 Clinical Practice I

4 credits; 3 class hours
 
This is the first course in a two-semester sequence that involves an intensive field-based teaching assignment for senior level students. Based upon the certification area participants will be involved in an internship for two semesters in an appropriate cooperating school setting. An additional internship setting will be required for students seeking certification in more than one area:
  1. Early Childhood - 3 Areas: Pre-kindergarten, Kindergarten, and Grades 1 to 2
  2. Childhood - 2 Areas:
Grades 1 to 3 and Grades 4 to 6 Special education majors will intern in a regular elementary classroom for one semester; the other term, they will intern in a special education classroom. Interns will be involved in a variety of experiences to enhance computer and technology literacy, an understanding of students with multicultural backgrounds, and the development of skills to address diverse student needs, including the exceptional learner and those with developmental disabilities. The internship will consist of on site supervision for 3 full days each semester. Pre-requisite: Permission of Chairperson/Co-requisites: EDUC 491; EDUC 507; EDUC 302 or EDUC 457)

EDUC 492 Clinical Practice II

4 credits; 10 class hours
 
This is the second course in a two-semester sequence that involves an intensive field-based teaching assignment for senior level students. Based upon the certification area participants will be involved in an internship for two - three semesters in an appropriate cooperating school setting. An additional internship setting will be required for students seeking certification in more than one area.
  1. Early Childhood -3 Areas:
    1. Pre-kindergarten, Kindergarten, Grades 1-2
  2. Childhood - 2 Areas:
    1. Grades 1-3, 4-6
  3. Middle Childhood - 2 Areas:
Grades 5-6, 7-9 Special education majors will intern in a regular elementary classroom for one semester, the other term, they will intern in a special education classroom. Interns will be involved in a variety of experiences to enhance computer and technology literacy, to promote an understanding of students with multicultural backgrounds, and development of skills to address diverse student needs, including the exceptional learner and those with developmental disabilities. The internship will consist of onsite supervision for 3 full days each semester. Pre-requisites: EDUC 481; EDUC 491; EDUC 457 or EDUC 302/ Co-requisite: EDUC 482

EDUC 494 Content Specialty Test Seminar

0 credit; 2 class hours
 
This seminar prepares candidates for the NYSTCE-CST Exam. Candidates complete a diagnostic exam (multiple choice items and an essay question), and several practice tests. Diagnostic information is reviewed and lessons prepared as indicated by disabilities and assessment diagnostic exam results. Pre-requisite: Permission of chairperson

EDUC 495 Content Specialty Test Students w/ Disabilities

0 credit; 2 class hours
 
This seminar prepares the Department's special education program candidates for the NYSTCE_CST Students w/ Disabilities Exam. Candidates complete a diagnostic exam (multiple choice items and an essay question) and several practice tests. Diagnostic information is reviewed and lessons prepared as indicated by disabilities and assessment diagnostic exam results. Pre-requisite: Permission of chairperson

EDUC 496 Critical Reading and Writing Seminar

0 credit, 2 class hours
 
This seminar is designed to prepare students to succeed in reading and writing in the discipline of education, particularly to be able to respond accurately to essay questions contained in the New York State Teacher Examinations. Understanding the language of the discipline is critical to being able to interpret the curriculum and teach it to students. We will explore the written assignments found on the LAST exam administered by the State of New York. Pre-requisite:
Passing Score on the CUNY Writing and CUNY Reading Exam

EDUC 498 Academic Literacy Skills Test (ALST) Test Prep Seminar

0 credit, 2 class hours
 
This seminar is designed to prepare students to succeed in taking the LAST portion of the State Certification exam for teaching. Since the exam questions are geared toward critical thinking and problem solving, there will be a concentration on analyzing questions. Students will learn some test taking strategies as well as strategies for interpreting the language of the questions that address the criteria for evaluation. Pre-requisite: Passing Score on the CUNY Writing and CUNY Reading Exam

EDUC 499 Educating All Students Test (EAS)

0 credit; 2 class hours
 
This seminar assists candidates in preparing for the New York State Teacher Certification Examination by reviewing general topics covering the knowledge, skills and dispositions needed for candidates about the learner, instructional planning and assessment, and the professional environment. They will engage in test taking with mock exams, essay writing and oral presentation on theory and practice. Pre-requisites: EDUC 481 and EDUC 491 Pre/Co-requisites: EDUC 311 and EDUC 315

EDUC 500 Independent Study for Education Majors

3 credits; 3 class hours
 
Independent study is designed to provide an organized course of study for students who are unable to attend regularly scheduled classes "for cause", and to provide opportunities for guided study and in-depth research in subject areas not covered by traditional courses.

Eligibility Criteria:

To qualify for enrollment in an Independent Study Course, undergraduate students should meet the following criteria:
  1. A cumulative Grade Point Average of 3.0 or better.
  2. Completion of ENGL 150.
  3. Meet the departmental criteria for bona fide exemption from the required course plan of study.
  4. Written contractual agreement between student and faculty.

EDUC 501 Field Experience Practicum: Shadowing Professionals

0 credit; 0 class hours
 
The seminar provides candidates with an understanding of the role and responsibilities of teachers. Candidates critically observe teachers as they plan and deliver instruction, interact with students and engage in the school community. Co-requisite: EDUC 102

EDUC 502 Field Experience Practicum: Classroom Observations

0 credits; 0 class hours
 
This course provides candidates with the opportunity to critically observe students in diverse and inclusive P-6 settings. The field experience provides candidates with an opportunity to contextualize understanding of child development and the nature and learning needs of children with exceptionalities. Co-requisite: EDUC 152

EDUC 503 Field Experience Practicum: Parents/Community as School Partners

0 credit; 0 class hours
 
This early field placement seminar provides candidates with an opportunity to understand the roles that parents/families play in their children's school life. Candidates will interact with Parent Coordinators, parents, administrators and school based community liaisons to develop an understanding of the differing perspectives and expectations of each these constituencies. Co-requisite: EDUC 231

EDUC 504 Field Experience Practicum: Technology in the Classroom

0 credit; 0 class hours
 
This is an early field experience in the use of educational technology.
It is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to integrate computer technology into the classroom curriculum. As part of EDUC 350 Computers in Education, students will design computer-mediated lessons and projects that will reflect the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to effectively use computers in teaching. They will learn to access and incorporate electronic resources and effectively incorporate them into the academic curriculum. Methods of evaluating instructional hardware, software, and interactive technology will be examined. In this field experience, pre-service teachers will work in local schools to implement their own lessons and observe and support the current use of technology in the school. Co-requisite: EDUC 350 Department of Education Medgar Evers College, CUNY . 111

EDUC 505 Field Experience Practicum: Working with Individual Learners

0 credit; 0 class hours
 
This seminar is designed to provide 20 hours of Early Field Placement for Education candidates enrolled in methods courses (EDUC 311 AND EDUC 315). The seminar will meet various times over the course of the semester and candidates will be placed in classroom settings where they will observe and work with individual learners. Candidates will be required to connect the theories of Reading Teaching and Learning, Math Teaching and Learning and Social Studies Teaching and Learning to practices that engage student learners in public school classrooms. Candidates will share their observations and work with students during the seminar in order to develop themselves as critical reflective practitioners. Co-requisite: EDUC 311

EDUC 506 Field Experience Practicum: Working with Small Groups of Learners

0 credit; 20 class hours
 
The seminar is designed to provide 20 hours of Early Field Placement for Education candidates enrolled in methods courses (EDUC 312, EDUC 314/317, and EDUC 381). The seminar will meet various times over the course of the semester 2007 and candidates will be placed in classroom settings where they will observe and work with small groups of learners. Candidates will be required to connect the theories of Reading Teaching and Learning, Social Studies Teaching and Learning, and Teaching Reading to Children with Special Needs, to practices that engage student learners in public school classrooms. Candidates will share their observations and work they do with students during the seminar in order to develop themselves as critical reflective practitioners. Co-requisite: EDUC 314 or EDUC 317

EDUC 507 Field Experience Practicum: Curriculum Research and Design

0 credit; 0 class hours
 
This early field placement seminar provides candidates with an opportunity to research curriculum in the school site at which they are conducting their clinical practice. In addition, this researching of the curriculum will be coupled with the conceptualization, design, and writing of a week-long interdisciplinary curriculum which is undertaken by the BA candidates in the co-requisite course, EDUC 457. Co-requisite: EDUC 457

EDUC 508 Field Experience Practicum: Assessment in Education

0 credit; 0 class hours
 
This seminar provides candidates with an understanding of assessment practices in educational settings and opportunities to develop assessment-related skills through planning an action research project related to assessment related practices in general and/or special education environments. Co-requisite: EDUC 34

EDUC 509 Field Experience Practicum: Assessment in Education II

0 credit; 0 class hours
 
This seminar provides candidates with an understanding of assessment practices in inclusive settings and opportunities to develop assessment-related skills with students with special needs. Co-requisite: EDUC 253