Course Description

 
ENGL 112 College Composition I
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This composition course emphasizes the various types of critical and  expository writing students will need in the content area courses they  will take throughout the college curriculum. Students will improve  their writing skills through the writing and revision of weekly essays  and through an in-depth focus on the conventions of language. Pre-requisites: Passing Score on the CUNY Writing and the CUNY  Reading Exam
 
ENGL 150 College Composition II
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This composition course continues the emphasis on the various types of critical and expository writing students will need in the content area courses they will take throughout the college curriculum. Students will improve their writing skills through the writing and revision of weekly essays and through the completion of two research papers that use MLA and APA research styles. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of ENGL 112 with a grade of "C” or better
 
ENGL 208 Applied Linguistics
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
ENGL 208 is an introductory course to linguistics. Its primary focus is the application of linguistic theories illustrated by the broad use and application of linguistic knowledge in a variety of fields: education, politics and diplomacy, law, business, gender issues, and culture. The course focuses primarily on readings in the following linguistic categories: the relationship between language and thought, culture and gender, oral history and literacy, form and meaning, discourse analysis, and the nature of the various linguistic semiotic systems. Students are introduced to technical vocabulary and linguistic inquiry methodology. Pre-requisite: ENGL 150
 
ENGL 209 Children's Literature
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course will introduce students to various genres of children’s literature, including folklore, myths, picture books, poetry, and novels. Students will read, discuss, analyze, and critically respond to children's literature. Emphasis will be placed on reading literature representing diverse voices and on considering ways to integrate those voices into the traditional children's literary canon. Pre-requisite:
 
ENGL 150 ENGL 210 Intermediate Composition
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This is a writing course emphasizing selected essays by writers across cultures and times. Focus is on every aspect of the essay, including style, diction, theme, organization, and analysis of the  role and function of the essay in different time periods and cultures. Students use these essays as models to construct their own  essays and to improve their own skills as writers of essays, and  consequently as writers in general. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 211 Introduction to Literary Studies
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
In this course, students will engage in critical readings of fiction, drama and poetry by authors of diverse cultures, nationalities and historical periods. Students will gain knowledge of literary terms and diverse theoretical perspectives, participate in discussions about selected works and write original essays involving close reading and research about literary topics. The course enables students to  recognize a variety of approaches to analyzing literary texts, to reflect  upon their own interpretations and to develop their skills in writing  critically about literature. Pre-requisite: ENGL 150
 
ENGL 212 World Literature: The Evolving Canon
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is a survey of the evolving canon of world literature and  will include selections of literature from around the world and from  diverse time periods, ancient to contemporary. Students will locate these texts in a historical and cultural context and gain a sense of the  development of, and connection between, literary texts across time  and across cultures. Genres studied may include the epic, drama, poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and folktales. Pre-requisite: ENGL 150 
 
ENGL 214 Critical Issues in World Literature
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course enhances students' understanding and appreciation of the global society in which they live through the study of literature. Students will study literature from multiple regions of the world  by reading works from the contemporary period and at least one  historical period. The selection of texts will center on recurring themes and critical issues in global literature, such as conflicts between groups of people and movement towards resolution.  Students will further develop their reading, writing and research skills. Pre-requisite: ENGL 212
 
ENGL 260 Professional Writing Workshop
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
Through a dual focus on their own and published writing, students are introduced to the skills needed in professional writing and publishing: writing, revision, editing, layout, and production. At the end of the semester, each student will submit one extensively revised piece for publication. Pre-requisite: ENGL 112
 
ENGL 301 Fiction Writing I
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is the first part of the Fiction Writing sequence. Students will learn the craft of writing fiction with specific emphasis on character description and development, perspective, distance and point of view, dialogue, plot, and setting. Students will analyze these elements of fiction in the work of published authors. They will write exercises that emphasize these elements, culminating  in a short story or excerpt of a novel that will effectively give  expression to their values and visions. They will revise their work based on peer critique and the editorial guidance of the instructor. Pre-requisite: ENGL 150
 
ENGL 302 Fiction Writing II
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is the second part of the Fiction Writing sequence. It is designed to help students develop and strengthen their sense of literary aesthetics. Students will continue to learn the craft of writing fiction by examining the work of published authors and by revising their work with the guidance of peer critique and the editorial advice of the instructor. Students will be expected to discuss each assigned reading, including readings of work written by their peers, paying particular attention to the elements of fiction and style, the writer’s use of language, and the vision and values evident in a work. Pre-requisites: ENGL150 and ENGL
 
301 ENGL 303 Poetry Writing I
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This is the first course in the Poetry Writing sequence. It will introduce students to major historical currents in poetry in English and in translation and the basic elements of poetry writing and critique. Readings for this course will expose students to a broad range of poetic styles: fixed structures (including sonnet, villanelle, sestina, and haiku), dramatic, narrative, and lyric verse. Students will gain an understanding of the aesthetic intentions grounding these traditions while developing a vocabulary for critical reading. Group discussion, peer critique, and student presentations are required. Pre-requisite: ENGL 150
 
ENGL 304 Creative Writing/Drama
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This writing workshop is designed for students to study the techniques of twentieth-century playwrights and to develop guided practice in writing for the stage. Students will also be required to evaluate their own work and the work of others in the workshop and  to read and discuss five plays. Lectures and discussion on craft issues will include voice, structure, format, submission techniques, and the play development process. Pre-requisite: ENGL 150
 
ENGL 305 Fiction Writing Workshop
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is the third and final part of the Fiction Writing sequence. It is a writing workshop course that will be almost entirely directed by students. Students will be responsible for selecting works of fiction to be discussed by the class and will lead the discussions, analyzing character description and development, dialogue, point of view, plot, setting, language and style, theme and premise. Students will also be responsible for analyzing each other's work according to guidelines set by instructor. They will revise their work based on peer and instructor guidance. Pre-requisites: ENGL 150 and ENGL 301 or ENGL 302
 
ENGL 306 Poetry Writing II
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This is the second course in the Poetry Writing sequence. It will familiarize students with critical thought and aesthetic discourse in contemporary poetry. Students will explore their own writing processes through the exchange of creative work and guided research. Assigned readings will prepare students to analyze a variety of writing styles with the object of refining their own creative impulses. Students will assemble a portfolio of rigorously revised, representative poems and a brief critical essay. Group discussion, peer critique, and student presentations are required. Pre-requisites:  ENGL 150 and ENGL 303
 
ENGL 307 Poetry Writing Workshop
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This is the third and final course in the Poetry Writing sequence. It will expand upon the skills learned earlier in the sequence by engaging students in the practice of writing to publish. Students will also be required to produce an academic prose critique of their own work, citing their influences and intentions and demonstrating fluency with critical vocabulary. Workshop students will contribute as both editors and poets to a class anthology and share collective responsibility for the quality of work collected and published. Accordingly, students will be required to communicate, defend, and challenge aesthetic values as necessary to work effectively in a group setting. Pre-requisites:  ENGL 150 and ENGL 303 or ENGL 306
 
ENGL 310 Journalism: News and Feature Writing
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This is course will focus on the changing nature of journalism. It provides students with an understanding of the principles, techniques, and strategies involved in journalism. In depth analysis and instruction will be given to details of the creation of the strong lead, a compelling story, structure, accuracy, attribution, and fact gathering. Along with the mechanics of writing and editing, students will explore how to get their stories published, meeting and working with editors, and creating unique story ideas. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing strong interviewing and research skills. Pre-requisite: ENGL 150
 
ENGL 311 Technical Writing
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course introduces students to the kinds of skills they will need to have in technically oriented professional careers. The curriculum is guided by the technical writing needs of business, industry, and society. Students write using various formats, including resumes, application letters, short reports, proposals, business plans, progress reports, and user guides. They review writing process and audience analysis, conventions, graphics, and document design. Web research skills, online writing, and library skills are also covered in the course.
Pre-requisite: ENGL 150
 
ENGL 312 Magazine Article Writing
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
The course is designed as a practical approach to planning, creating,  and placing magazine articles. Students will strengthen their writing skills and gain experience writing articles, essays, interviews,  and reviews for publication in both print magazines and online  publications. Students will read and study different types of magazine writing, such as feature writing, reviewing, personal essays, and  editorials with the aim of producing such works themselves. Pre-requisite: ENGL 150
 
ENGL 313 Writing for Science and Technology
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course focuses on teaching students the skills needed to write scientific and technical documents, such as reports, proposals, essays, and instruction manuals. Emphasis is on writing technical  and scientific documents that are clear and free of jargon. Students will study scientific and technical rhetorical styles, the conventions of scientific and technical writing, and the languages and processes of scientific research. Students must write a major paper on a topic in science or technology. Pre-requisite: ENGL 150
 
ENGL 314 Linguistics: A Cross-cultural Perspective
3-6 credits; 3-6 class hours
 
This study abroad/ applied linguistics course is designed to help students gain a linguistic perspective on written and oral communication, and, at the same time, apply that methodology to daily communication with people of varied ethnic backgrounds.
The course focuses primarily on readings in the following linguistic categories: the relationship between language and thought, culture and gender, oral history and literacy, form and meaning, discourse analysis, and the nature of the Chinese and American linguistic semiotic systems. Students are introduced to technical vocabulary and linguistic inquiry methodology. Course requirements include a research project and papers related to readings and fieldwork experiences in China. Pre-requisite: ENGL 150
 
ENGL 315 British Literature I: 8th - 18th Centuries
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course consists of selected readings from major British writers and literary movements from the earliest forms through the 18th century. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211 ENGL 316 British Literature II: 19th - 21st Centuries 3 credits; 3 class hours This course consists of selected readings from major British writers  and literary movements from the 19th century to the present. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 319 African American Literature I: 1619 - 1932
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course presents selected readings from African American literature, oral and written, from the 17th century through the Negro Renaissance of the 1920s to 1932. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 320 African American Literature II: 1932 - Present
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course presents selected readings from Black American literature, oral and written, from the Harlem Renaissance through the  present. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 322 American Literature I: Beginnings to the  Emancipation Proclamation
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
Beginning with Native American oral forms and continuing through the Civil War, this course explores principal authors, folklore, and literary movements as they reflect the heritage, legacy, and diversity of American culture. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 323 American Literature II: Reconstruction to the Present
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course explores the development of American Literature from the Post Civil War period to the present. Principal authors, folklore, and literary movements as they reflect the heritage, legacy, and diversity of American culture are studied. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 325 Caribbean Literature I: Beginnings to 1970
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course consists of selected readings in travel narratives, fiction, poetry, autobiography, and drama from major authors and texts beginning with European representations of the colonial encounter in the Early Modern period and concluding with the literature and literary movements of the independence era. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 326 African Literature
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course provides students with selected readings from the vast diversity of African voices from its early orator to its major modern figures. Students will examine some of the historical, political, social,  and ideological forces that have helped shape African literature.
Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 327 Caribbean Literature II: 1970 to the Present
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course consists of selected readings by major Caribbean authors in fiction, poetry, and drama from 1970 through the present. Emphasis is on the stylistic and thematic concerns of the literature as well as its relation to the physical, social, political, and intellectual landscape. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 328 Latin American Literature
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course examines 19th-and 20th-century Latin American literature, focusing on major works that represent important literary trends in Latin American literature and locating those texts within their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 330 Postcolonial Literature
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course investigates some of the overarching themes that connect the literature produced in the postcolonial era in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and the Americas. Questions of economic dependency and marginalization, linguistic autonomy, and cultural hybridity are among the issues that will be explored through a study of literature and critical theory. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 331 Asian American Literature
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course will introduce students to the critical questions that shape and challenge what we know as Asian American literature, a largely emerging, contested field of study. Students will examine the political, theoretical implications of the now familiar conjunction of "Asian" and "American." Further, they will trace the ways in which Asian American writers themselves try to negotiate the complexity of being Asian and American. Through close readings of the representative literature and criticism, students will locate the sites of Asian America in the US political and historical imaginary. Special attention will be given to autobiographical narratives that directly or indirectly question the status of Asian America as a viable racial, cultural, political identity. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 332 Modernist Literature
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course will examine the literature of the modernist movement in English and in translation. It will cover the period between 1890 and 1940 on both sides of the Atlantic. Students will be given a broad overview of the major tenets of this movement as well as an in-depth study of some of its major works on the margins. Some focus will be given to works of the Harlem Renaissance. Pre-requisite: ENGL 212
 
ENGL 333 The Body in Place and Culture
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course examines the cross-cultural representations of the body in literature and the arts across different times and places. It analyzes the social construction of the "ideal" body in terms of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, able-bodiedness and other areas of "difference" and focuses on the ways that certain types of bodies are constricted or move freely through space along the private/public continuum. The course highlights such issues as enslavement, trafficking, migration, barriers and borders, discourses about "acceptable" bodies, racial profiling, sexuality, violence and safe spaces and the ways these topics have been represented through literature and other cultural representations. Pre-requisite:  ENGL 150
 
ENGL 334 Popular Fiction
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
The course explores, in depth, a specific genre of contemporary popular fiction and its relation to the canon. These genres may include but are not limited to, horror, detective, science fiction, romance and the graphic novel. From the genre's roots to today’s novels, we examine their history, classic titles and authors. We also locate these works in the academic and publishing fields, and explore the gap between them and literary fiction. Through close reading we explore what tropes and themes shape these often controversial literary genres. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 360 Black Women Writers
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course examines the literature of Black American women from 1746 through the Black Arts Movement of 1955-1970 and shows how these writings address some of the central issues that have faced Western society. Some of the writers include: Phillis Wheatly, Francis Ellen Watkins Harper, Harriet E. Wilson, Linda Brent Jacobs, Ida B.  Wells, Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, Ann  Petry, Margaret Walker, Lorraine Hansberry, Paule Marshall, Nikki  Giovanni, Sonia Sanchez, Audre Lorde, Jayne Cortez, Alice Walker,  Toni Morrison, and Maya Angelou. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 361 Shakespeare
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course examines selected Shakespearean plays within the social, cultural, and political context of the Renaissance. A brief history of the development of the drama and a study of Shakespeare’s sources are included in the course. Pre-requisite:  ENGL 211
 
ENGL 362 Advanced Professional Writing Workshop
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
Using the skills learned in ENGL 260 or in previous publication experiences, students will work intensively on a group publication project to be published and distributed by the end of the semester. This practicum will include writing, production, layout, publicity, and distribution and requires the ability to work cooperatively and independently. Pre-requisite: ENGL 260
 
ENGL 363 Literature of the Global City I
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course will examine the thematic and stylistic characteristics of the literary representations of a particular global city. While the course will consider the context of 20th century literary production centering on the modern metropolis, the primary focus will be on the literature of the 21st century global city. Drawing on a range of theoretical perspectives, the course will concentrate its analysis on the diverse literary responses to the new configurations and contested spaces of the contemporary city. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 364 Literature of the Global City II
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course will examine the thematic and stylistic characteristics of the literary representations of a particular global city. While the course will consider the context of 20th century literary production centering on the modern metropolis, the primary focus will be on the literature of the 21st century global city. Drawing on a range of theoretical perspectives, the course will concentrate its analysis on the diverse literary responses to the new configurations and contested spaces of the contemporary city. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 365 Applied Literary Theory
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course provides students with an understanding of the great traditions of literary criticism. Students will explore their own literary interests and apply both historical and current methods of criticism to literary texts. Pre-requisite: ENGL 212
 
ENGL 366 African Women's Literature
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course focuses on the contemporary literature of African women, examining their works themes and styles. Through the study of this literature and related scholarship, students are also introduced to important debates that affect or define African women's writings, including the politics of the literary canon and language, pre- and post-colonial discourses and African feminism or a newly-envisioned womanhood, as well as the urgent issues of ageism, racism and sexism. Authors to be examined include Chimamanda Ngozi Adichi, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Janice Boddy/Aman, Fadumo Korn, Sindiwe Magona,  Winnie Mandela, Flora Nwapa, among others. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 370 Special Topics in Literature I
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
Through selected readings, students will explore special topics in literature through the perspective of a unifying theoretical or thematic concept. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 371 Special Topics in Literature II
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
Through selected readings, students will explore special topics in literature through the perspective of a unifying theoretical or thematic concept. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 372 Special Topics in Literature III
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
Through selected readings, students will explore special topics in literature through the perspective of a unifying theoretical or thematic concept. Pre-requisite: ENGL 211
 
ENGL 410 Honors Seminar for English Majors
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course will allow students in the English BA degree program to undertake an in-depth study of a particular author or period, including close readings of major works, bibliographical and cultural information on the author or period. Pre-requisite: Permission of Chairperson
 
ENGL 420 English Internship I
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This first semester internship course provides an opportunity for upper-level students to apply their skills and knowledge in the workplace or in an organization related to their English concentration.
Students are supported by weekly meetings with the coordinator and supervised by an internship site coordinator. Pre-requisite:  Permission of Chairperson
 
ENGL 422 English Internship II/Senior Thesis
2 credits; 3 class hours
 
English 422: Senior Thesis is the English BA capstone course. Students write a senior thesis in their area of concentration under the guidance of a faculty mentor. To support that writing process, students also participate in three double-period seminars (9 hours)
on research techniques and writing styles. These seminars are conducted by the coordinator for this course. Faculty mentors, however, have the primary responsibility of guiding students through the process of developing their senior theses and for approving their final drafts. Students must register the title of the senior thesis and the name of the faculty mentor with the English Concentration coordinator by the following dates: January graduation: Wednesday before Thanksgiving, June graduation: February 1, August graduation: April 1. Pre-requisite: ENGL 420
 
ENGL 500 Independent Study
3-6 credits; 3-6 class hours
 
This course of study centers on a project in the major area. With the prior approval of a faculty supervisor, the student will undertake a project, which will constitute the semester's work. One weekly conference is required. Pre-requisite: Permission of Chairperson
 
ENGW 005 Composition I
0 credits ; 3 class hours; 1.5 lab hours
 
This first level of writing is an intensive course that focuses on fluency and clarity in writing by requiring students to become aware of their own writing process and to learn to use that process to shape, revise and perfect their writing. Students will read and discuss narrative and personal essays and/or works of fiction as a basis for extensive personal writing, including journals, culminating in their ability to write logical and well organized personal (narrative) essays. Students own writing will be used as the primary basis for instruction in paragraph development, major areas of grammar, including verb tense and subject-verb and pronoun-verb agreement. The major competency for this course is the ability to write a well-organized narrative or personal essay, which demonstrates the capacity to write standard written English fluently and with clarity. This competency is evaluated through a timed two-hour final essay examination. Pre-requisites: Incoming Student and Placement by CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
 
ENGW 006 Composition II
0 credits; 3 class hours; 1.5 lab hours
 
This course focuses on improving students' composition skills along with enriching their college experience by exposing them to the arts through classroom lectures, museum visits, plays, and selected movies, various other forms of written literature and by familiarizing them with library and campus support services. The course emphasizes students' intellectual growth, analytical and writing skills. Its primary focus is on the writing of the persuasive essay. To this end, students compose essays incorporating a full range of rhetorical devices of narration, description, cause and effect, comparison and contrast and persuasion. Assignments will involve interpreting persuasive questions to determine fact from opinion to facilitate thesis development (position statement). The course will also focus on drafting, revising, editing and students' norming sessions of persuasive essays. Among the language arts skills to be focused on are fluency, logical expression, paragraphing, essay organization, sentence structure, appropriate use of certain parts of speech, major areas of grammar, comma usage, subject-verb agreement, pronoun antecedent agreement, past & present participle, proper usage of verb tenses and the apostrophe. There will be periodic tests and/or quizzes, midterm and an end of semester departmental examination to assess students' progress and readiness to sit for the final CUNY Placement Assessment Test in writing - the ACT. Upon passing of the ACT, students will exit basic skills in writing. Pre-requisites: ENGW 005 or Incoming Students and Placement by CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
 
ENGR 005 Critical Reading I
0 credits; 3 class hours; 1.5 lab hours
 
The primary focus of this course is on comprehension of written materials. Students receive considerable practice in analyzing paragraphs and expository texts in various academic disciplines. They identify the main idea, supporting details, and cohesive devices. Emphasis is also placed on extending students' vocabulary. Although this course focuses on the comprehension of written texts, an integrative learning model involving listening, speaking and writing is used to help students become more competent readers of Standard American English. Students develop an understanding of the relationship between reading and writing through writing responses to varied readings. They also gain a multicultural perspective as a means of better understanding the American culture by reading and discussing at least one novel and several selections from different cultures. Pre-requisites: Incoming Student and Placement by CUNY/ ACT Assessment Test
 
ENGR 006 Critical Literacy II
0 credits; 3 class hours; 1.5 lab hours
 
The primary focus of this course is on improving critical reading and college level study skills. Students in this course are guided to be more competent and critical readers of Standard English expository and literary prose. Students read, interpret, and discuss college level expository and literary prose articles on current events. Although this course focuses on critical and college study skills, an integrative learning model involving listening, speaking, reading, and writing is used to help students become more competent and critical readers of Standard English. This course prepares students to pass the CUNY/ACT exam in reading. Using a college reading skills textbook, students learn skills in vocabulary development and reading comprehension as well as basic study and test taking strategies. Students read selected narratives, essays, and biographies reflecting different cultures and engage in class discussions of themes and other aspects of the text. Students are assigned informal written responses. The major competency for ENGR 006 is to become an active reader while becoming competent in fundamental college reading and study skills. This competency is \evaluated through a two-hour end of semester departmental examination that integrates reading and writing to assess students' progress and readiness to sit for the final CUNY Placement Assessment Test in reading - the ACT. Upon passing of the ACT, students will exit basic skills in reading. Pre-requisites: ENGR 006 or Incoming Student and Placement by CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
 
ENRW 005 English Reading & Writing I
0 credit; 7.5 class hours
 
The English reading/ writing 005 is a hybrid course that focuses on students diagnosed as requiring first level English reading and writing competencies. This course concentrates on developing students' critical reading, writing and analytical thinking skills; the program of study focuses on assisting students in developing their ability to read various topical texts and determine main idea, supporting details, making inferences and drawing conclusions and transferring these skills to summarizing and analyzing readings and critically responding to them in short essays. Types of essays studied in this course include personal narratives, descriptive, expository and persuasive essays. Upon successful completion of this course students are expected to demonstrate competency in reading and facility in the use of the written English language, emphasizing eloquence, clarity, a diverse vocabulary, sentence variety, and satisfactory grammar and mechanics. Pre-requisite: None
 
ENRW 006 English Reading & Writing II
0 credit; 7.5 class hours
 
This course focuses on improving students' composition skills along with enriching their critical reading skills necessary for college work. Reading, composition and study skills are applied to college level texts from literature, social science, or other content courses. An integrative reading/writer model is used; students are required to improve vocabulary, pursue clarity in their writings, write formal essays and informal critical responses to varied readings of college level materials. Students are taught how to summarize readings, locating main idea, supporting details and inferences. Pre-requisite: ENRW 005 or Incoming Student and Placement by CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
 
ESLR 005 Reading English as a Second Language I
0 credits; 4.5 class hours
 
This course caters to the ESL student who has successfully passed the ESL 002 course or who has been placed on this level by his/ her reading placement test score. This first level reading course is for students whose writing placement exams contain ESL patterns. The primary focus of this course is on the comprehension of written materials. Students receive considerable practice in analyzing paragraphs and expository texts in various academic disciplines. They identify the main idea, supporting details, and cohesive devices. Emphasis is also placed on extending students' vocabulary. Although this course focuses on the comprehension of written texts, an integrative learning model involving listening, speaking, reading, and writing is used to help students become more competent readers of Standard English. Students must pass the departmental final to exit from this course. The ESL students, in addition, will practice and improve their spoken English as well as comprehend the spoken words. Pre-requisites: A placement score of 44 or lower on the COMPASS reading exam and evidence of ESL writing patterns.
 
ESLR 006 Reading English as a Second Language II
0 credits; 4.5 class hours
 
ESLR 006 is one level above the 005. Students entering this level are guided to become more competent and critical readers of Standard English expository and literary prose. This second level reading course is for students whose writing placement exams contain ESL patterns. The primary focus of this course is on improving critical and college study skills. Students read, interpret, and discuss college level expository and literary prose and articles on current events.
Although this course focuses on critical and college study skills, an integrative learning model involving listening, speaking, reading, and writing is used to help students become more competent and critical readers of Standard English. Students must pass the departmental final to exit this course. Pre-requisites: A placement score of 45 65 on the COMPASS reading exam and evidence of ESL writing patterns.
 
ESLW 005 Writing English as a Second Language I
0 credits; 4.5 class hours
 
This first level ESL writing course is for students whose first language is other than English and whose placement scores demonstrate that they have achieved a degree of fluency in writing Standard English. The primary focus of this course is on sentence clarity and basic essay organization. However, the approach utilized will be an integrative learning model, emphasizing listening, speaking, reading, and writing, to help students become more linguistically competent in the writing of Standard English. Students read expository texts from various academic disciplines and compose, revise, and edit short essays. Academic Foundation Division Students must pass the departmental final to exit this course. Pre-requisites: A placement score of 4 or lower on the CUNY ACT writing test and show evidence of ESL writing patterns.
 
ESLW 006 Writing English as a Second Language II
0 credits; 4.5 class hours
 
This second level writing course is for students whose first language is other than English. The primary focus of this course is on students' mastery of the essay form. An integrative learning model is used to:
  • enable students to read and analyze literary and expository essays, and
  • use a variety of rhetorical models as they compose, revise, and edit essays.
In addition, students review diction, word order, use of tenses, control of articles and prepositions, and idiomatic expressions. Students must pass the departmental final to exit this course. Pre-requisites: A placement score of 5-6 CUNY ACT writing test and show evidence of ESL writing patterns
 
HUM 102 The Spoken Word in African American Written Texts
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This seminar and workshop begins with a foundation of the history and origins of the spoken word in African American literature. Beginning with the study of the griot and continuing through hip hop, students analyze the elements of power and style in African American oral dialects, poetry, and spoken word performances. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to apply their knowledge of spoken word literary techniques to their composing and writing of lyrics and other elements of the literary poetic tradition. Students will also participate in spoken word performances. Co-requisite: ENGW006 or completion of developmental skill courses
 
HUM 300 Contemporary Topics in the Humanities
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
The critical examination of a current topic relative to values, mores, cultures, ideas, arts, etc. Topics will be announced in advance. Pre-requisite: Permission of Chairperson
 
HUM 400 Independent Studies in Humanities
3-6 credits; 3-6 class hours
 
This course of study centers on a project in the major concentration area, which incorporates content and depth not covered in regular course offerings. With the prior approval of a faculty supervisor, the student will undertake a project, which will constitute the semester's work. One weekly conference is required. (Option in art, English, foreign languages, media, music, philosophy, speech.) Pre-requisites: Completion of 6 credits, or the equivalent, in the major area of study with a grade of B or better and acceptance by a faculty supervisor. Permission of Chairperson required Department of English