Course Description

 
PA 103 Introduction to Public Administration
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is an introduction to theories, concepts and approaches in Public Administration including basic ideas and techniques relevant to administrative processes in public decision-making, personnel systems, budget processes, and communication systems.
Pre-requisite: ENGL 150
 
PA 150 Introduction to Criminal Law
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is specifically designed to provide students with a basic understanding of criminal law and the criminal justice system. It will include the history, theory, and practice of substantive criminal law and the criminal justice system. It will include the legislative purpose and responsibilities, the major elements of statutory offenses and their application in the Criminal Justice Process. Pre-requisite: PA 103 Co-requisite: ENGL 112
 
PA 200 Introduction to Non-Profit Administration
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of the organizational, personnel, budgetary and other related concepts in the management of a non-profit entity. It will use a series of textbook reading materials, audio/visual media, and case studies to further enhance the students understanding and development into effective public/non-profit managers. Pre-requisite: PA 103 Co-requisite: ENGL 112
 
PA 202 Government and Business
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
Business and Government are two of the most powerful entities in society that share both a cooperative and competitive relationship. This course will analyze the relationship between these entities, as well as demonstrate how each is necessary for the advancement of human progress. Beginning with the US Constitution, this course will provide students with the foundation of democracy and capitalism. It will illustrate how the marketplace finances public efforts and how the government is used to protect and mobilize the interests of businesses/consumers via regulations, contracts and money in general. Finally, this course will illustrate how decision-making in each sector is impacted by each other's continued presence. Prerequisite: PA 103 Pre/Co-requisites: ENGL 112
 
PA 205 Public Personnel Administration
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course will study nature and characteristics of government civil service. It will also explore a broader analysis of the civil service law and a clearer understanding of how human resource policies and procedures contribute to the attainment of governmental objectives. Accordingly, it will study routine practices of the civil service including human resource strategic planning, position management, staffing, performance evaluation management and maintenance of supportive workplace relations. Pre-requisite: PA 103 Pre/Co-requisite: ENGL 112
 
PA 211 New York State and Local Government
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is an introduction to state and local government in New York. It will provide students with an understanding of the day-to-day issues of local and state governmental units, non- governmental organizations, and administrations in New York. Students will gain the knowledge background of the issues such as sanitation, public safety, transportation, housing, and other matters that govern the quality of life in New York State. They will be exposed to their policies, processes, and the frameworks that structure the decision making entities of this city and state. Pre-requisite: PA 103 Pre/Co-requisite: ENGL 112
 
PA 214 Organizational Theory in the Public Sector
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is designed to provide students with the historical development of organizations and how they function on a daily basis. It will examine organizations in the public sector, non-profit, and private sectors, and make important distinctions between them. We will begin with the classical theories from Weber, Wilson, Gulick, Simon, and more, and move on to the daily complexities of organizational behavior. We will analyze what makes these organizations distinctive amongst each other, but more importantly, understand the different lenses and approaches that these institutions are analyzed and studied from and how they have evolved through different eras. We will cover important topics on decision-making, division of labor, bureaucracy, leadership and management, diversity, organizational learning and culture, and the relationships between organizations and our environment. On that note, we will be applying this course to the organizations that we work in and interact with daily. Pre-requisite: PA 103 Co-Requisite: ENGL 112
 
PA 215 Designing Local Programs and Proposal Writing
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
The purpose of this class is to provide students with an overview of the design of a local/urban social service program. It will identify community needs, stakeholders, advocates, pros and cons to the implementation of such programs. It will develop a workable grant proposal to obtain funding for the program. It will cover the basics of grant and proposal writing. Pre-requisite: PA 200, Co-requisite: ENGL 112
 
PA 225 Introduction to Public Policy
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course presents students with an overview of the policy-making process beginning with Problem Identification and agenda-setting and concluding with evaluation and revision or termination. The course will describe and analyze the political environment of policy-making in the United States. Emphasis will be placed on the executive and legislative branches of government. Students will be acquainted with the role of key agents of influence on official policy makers such as: interest groups, political parties, the media, and Think Tank Organizations. Topics will include welfare reforms, immigration, environmental and foreign policy to name a few. Cutting edge study approach will be used coupled with analysis of major debates in print and electronic media. Pre-requisite: PA 150
 
PA 235 Criminal Justice and Its Processes
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course examines the application of relevant U.S. and State Constitutional requirements and restrictions on the investigation and prosecution of criminal offenses. Students will also examine the Federal Rules of Procedure and New York Criminal Procedure Law in order to gain an understanding of the standard operating procedures of the criminal justice system. Particular focus will be on the exclusionary rule and other process remedies, the laws regarding arrest and speedy trial, general trial law and processes, sentencing and appeals. Pre-requisites: PA 103 and ENGL 112
 
PA 250 Community Supervision: Parole and Probation
3 credits; 3 class hours 
 
This course provides students with an understanding of parole and probation as they relate to public safety with an emphasis on community supervision. It is designed to advance concepts of public and personal safety as they influence larger community interests. The course will assist students in comparing conventional practices, determining their effectiveness and reviewing their success at achieving measurable outcomes. Students will develop a working understanding of public safety through the examination of the legal authority, techniques and resources used by parole and probation to maintain social control. They will compare various models of parole, community supervision and probation in jurisdictions outside of New York State. Students will be further challenged to complete group projects that analyze and determine the best, most cost effective, least restrictive means of protecting the public through the use of community supervision. The course is designed to facilitate debate about the purpose and role of community supervision, techniques of accountability for monitoring goals and objectives and identification of factors that support or mitigate against their fulfillment. The goal of the course is to understand the factors that support effective community supervision policies and protect public safety. Pre-requisite: PA 235
 
PA 260 Constitutional Law and Civil Liberties
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course will examine constitutional law emphasizing civil rights and individual liberties, and also their relation to the criminal justice system. The method of teaching will include reading and discussing U.S. Supreme Court decisions. Students will gain the ability to analyze and apply policies derived from critical-analytic reasoning over selected portions of the U.S. Constitution, the ability to recognize important and relevant considerations involved in real-life issues and situations dealing with civil liberties and civil rights, and a working familiarity with key terms, clauses, cases, and historical formations in Constitutional Law. Pre-requisite: PA 103, Pre/Corequisite: ENGL 112
 
PA 275 Community Policing
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course introduces students to the philosophy of community policing with an emphasis on crime prevention techniques that "foster cooperation and mutual respect" between the community and police. It is designed to provide an understanding of the precursors of crime and how residents in partnership with local law enforcement and other stakeholders can work collaboratively to preserve public safety. Furthermore, it will offer opportunities for students to compare crime fighting techniques in different cities and broaden their knowledge and understanding of the ingredients of successful community policing. Students will analyze problems that both citizens and law enforcement officers confront in urban communities and devise solutions based on the problem solving dimension of community policing. Instructors will introduce students to a technique known as "environmental criminology", so that they will develop the kind of analytical skills that will allow them to assess, evaluate and interpret the conditions and circumstances under which crime occurs. In the process, students will understand the importance and need for a neighborhood-oriented approach that is culturally competent, ethnically sensitive and linguistically appropriate when policing in urban communities. Lastly, Students will learn that obtaining and preserving "public safety" is not merely the responsibility of law enforcement but, instead, is achieved more so by the active participation of community residents with shared values that reflect respect for self, property, the law and their community. Pre-requisite: PA 250
 
PA 285 International Administration
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course examines the historical, institutional and theoretical backgrounds of the contemporary United Nations and its related agencies. This course will focus on the participation of selected countries in the United Nations structure and operation with regard to current international problems and issues. Topics include the challenges faced by the United Nations and its related agencies such as the International Labor Organization (ILO), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), World Health Organization (WHO), and more. The course will explore these agencies' bureaucratic structures, management styles and functions. Pre-requisite: PA 103 Pre/Co-requisite: ENGL 150
 
PA 295 Intergovernmental Relations
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course begins with a historical overview of federalism in the United States, as well as a thorough analysis by the Framers' intent on the "balance of power" between state and federal government. It examines the complex and interdependent relationships amongst the various levels of government and also the relationships among different groups (public, private, and nonprofit). It examines the different funding patterns that exist to develop and implement public programs as well as the service delivery of these programs. Prerequisite: PA 103 Pre/Co-requisite: ENGL 150
 
PA 300 Public Bureaucracy
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course will study the organization and operation of public bureaucracies, with emphasis on the source of bureaucracy power, implementation of public policies, and approaches to controlling the bureaucracy. Examples of American bureaucratic structures and procedures will be analyzed. Pre-requisite: PA 225 Pre/Co-requisite: ENGL 150
 
PA 301 Education Policy
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course examines public policy decision-making in education at the local, state, and national levels and its impact on educational institutions, students, parents, and the community. It will analyze the past and current educational policies in the context of positive and negative effects of specific segments of the population, as well as future or alternative educational/Institutional policies and practices that support the achievement of diverse students. Students will not only analyze intended consequences, but unintended consequences as well, in the hopes of providing effective feedback to policy makers and community representatives. This course will also analyze the spillover effects that educational policies have for urban communities. Prerequisite: PA 103 Pre/Co-requisite: ENGL 112
 
PA 304 e-Government
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
Based on the concept of Total Quality Management, e-Government emphasizes the need to provide better quality services to its citizens, businesses, and other governmental agencies. In this age of globalization, it is important for individuals to have access to information and to be included in the democratic process. Citizens will be able to gain access to services that they would otherwise be "locked out of" due to the redundancy of agency requirements. This course seeks to provide students with the historical underpinnings of e-government. Students will have the opportunity to survey government services, programs, and agencies to see if the U.S. is increasing its visions of democracy at all levels of government. It seeks to introduce students to how technology and internet usage are used to expand the services of government. It introduces the administrative and policy issues related to managing information in public and non-profit agencies and institutions. Pre-requisite: PA 300 Co-requisite: ENGL 150
 
PA 315 Case Study in Public Policy Development
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is an introductory to the case study approach. Complex policy issues will be identified discussed and analyzed with relation to the chief Executive Office and the Legislative Branch. Emphasis will be placed on how cutting edge issues are placed in agenda setting; and the political strategies used to maneuver in the bureaucratic systems. Topical issues such as welfare reform, national security, terrorism, foreign affairs, immigration, global warming, and transportation will be examined. Pre-requisite: PA 225
 
PA 320 Introduction to Discharge Planning
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
Public administrators in the field of criminal justice are consistently faced with the task of assisting formerly incarcerated individuals with reintegrating into society. Unfortunately, they consistently fall short of this task and the individual, who is looking forward to reentry, oftentimes fall behind. This course consists of a series of lectures, work group exercises and life-skill presentations designed to support the development of community reintegration plans for individuals leaving prison. It is designed to provide the public manager with necessary skills and elements needed to construct such a plan and explores both the theoretical and practical basis for it. It focuses on providing intensive skills building and training to help students to not only understand the parole discharge process, but to also understand the aspects that bureaucratic agencies must overcome to put these plans in motion. This course also helps to facilitate a greater appreciation of the role played by nonprofit organizations in local and urban neighborhoods, as part of the successful transition of large numbers of people exiting the prison system into urban communities. It advocates for greater inclusion of local communities in the community reintegration process since the return of these large numbers of people will directly impact their lives. Pre/Co-requisite: ENGL 150
Department of Public Administration
 
PA 325 Fiscal Administration
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course analyzes procedures and methods past, present, and prospective - used in the resource allocation process of government. Topics covered includes: Budgeting Systems, The Budgeting Process, Budgeting Reform, Approaches to Budgeting, Budget Preparation, Budget Approval, Concepts Related to Fiscal Administration, Government and the Economy, and the Changing Functions of Budgeting. Pre-requisite: PA 300 Pre/Co-requisite: ENGL 150
 
PA 326 Ethics in Government
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course will inquire into the ethics and values embedded in public sector delivery. It will examine the historical traditions, ethical theories and universal principles and values such as respect for others, honesty, equality, fairness, laws and accountability upon which ethics in Government has been established. The course will also examine the ideals of ethics and values in its legal and social dimensions and from the standpoint of both theoretical and applied ethics. It will focus on developing and transmitting knowledge about ethical and value dimensions that characterize the services on all levels in public administration. It will consider ethical dilemmas in both the internal and external environment of public service operation. Pre-requisite: PA 300 Pre/Co-requisite: ENGL 150
 
PA 330 Public Policy, Advocacy, Systems Management, and Administration in Services for the Aged
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course involves a study of systems management and administrative theories as they relate to public and voluntary issues which have an impact on the elderly. Legal rights, Social Security Act, Medicare, will be explored to promote the development of gerontology advocacy skills. The six (6) hours per week field practicum with older persons will be provided a variety of community settings. Pre-requisite: PA 225
 
PA 335 Principles of Philanthropy, Fundraising, and Development
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
The purpose of this class is to provide students with the skills to make a non-profit organization financially viable. Fundraising is the most important component of any nonprofit organization and in order to be effective leaders, our students need to be exposed to what it takes to generate money for these organizations. We will take a detailed look at the essential non-profit areas of fundraising and philanthropy using YMCA and Big Brother/Big Sisters case study information as well as internet and audio/visual information. This course builds upon the concepts learned in PA 200 Introduction to Non-Profit Management. Pre-requisites: PA 215 and PA 300
 
PA 340 Strategic Planning, Budgeting, and Project Management
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
In this course, organizational problems of public agencies are scrutinized. The planning, budgeting, project developments and management practices are examined. Particular attention is given to problems and their solutions that originate within their systems. It provides systematic approach to government budget initiations, to project planning, implementation, control and close out. Various techniques and models for quantitative/qualitative risk assessment and risk management is surveyed. Pre-requisite: PA 225
 
PA 350 Theories of Urban Administration
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course is designed to examine the differing theories and practices as to how urban governance, administration, and politics operate. Students will study the critical issues concerning Urban America and the approaches that decision makers and leaders have taken. A great deal of attention will be given to urban social and economic problems such as urban sprawl, racism, poverty, crime, and national urban policy and the resources used in tackling these issues. We will examine decision making over different time periods, in its current state, and where it might go. We will also examine the current state of revitalization and the enhancement of urban living. Pre-requisite: PA 300
 
PA 365 Crime and Punishment in Urban America
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course provides students with an urban based concentration in the study of the causes and effects of the convergence of mass incarceration, mass unemployment and mass disenfranchisement in inner-city communities. Particular emphasis will be on the perspective of urban communities most impacted by these phenomena, with a focus on the structural impediments which challenge the notion of re-entry (redefined as nu-entry) for thousands of individuals each year. Central to the course will be the study and examination of urban social trends that relate to increases and decreases in crime during different periods. Further, the course explores the impact of these phenomena on the large numbers ofof men and women returning to urban neighborhoods from incarceration. The course will be dedicated to discussing community based problem solving approaches. The course adopts the position of viewing our local community, region, country and world as a laboratory for analyzing issues related to crime and punishment. It uses a non-traditional approach to provide opportunities to explore the myriad of problems inherent in the transfer of huge numbers of people from incarceration back into society. Pre-requisite: PA 360
 
PA 390 Research Methodology for Public Administrators
3 credits; 3 class hours 
 
This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of research methodology and statistics. Students will learn how to design a research project based on the critical issues and problems within the field of Public Administration and beyond. This course provides students with the critical research skills needed to become effective public administrators. Students will also learn to use the Statistical Processing Software (SPSS) to analyze data in order to make managerial and policy decisions. This course will use the common ideologies and perceptions that we approach in our everyday lives. Hence, this course will teach students how to address problems that affect the world. Pre-requisite: PA 214 Co-requisite: ENGL 150 and LIB 100
 
PA 395 Public Administration and Disaster Management
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This Course aims at providing a broad understanding of the strategic role and functions of the public administrative system in the context of disasters. It will examine the bureaucratic arrangements of disaster-related agencies and institutions, such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Response Agency (CDERA), to understand their capacities to reasonably predict and aggressively respond to both natural and human-associated disasters. The Course will engage in a comparative study of the more well-known national disaster response agencies in the disaster-prone regions of the world, at the same time, will inquire into public administration best practices that have emerged. Pre-requisite: PA 300
 
PA 405 Regional and Municipal Administration
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
Critical issues in the delivery of local and municipal services such as police, fire, sanitation, health, hospital, and welfare are examined in relation to community needs and competition for limited resources. Traditional and alternative forms of local and metropolitan administrative structure, planning, and financing are reviewed. Regional administrator, authorities and other quasi-public models, as vehicle to meet urban and local needs and how to mobilize and conserve local municipal resources are studied resources. Pre-requisite: PA 300
 
PA 407 Comparative Public Administration
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course will study theories of comparative public administration, methodological problems and practical concerns in comparing different systems. Students can analyze major administrative structures and institutions including resource, allocation and utilization, machinery of coordination, and other related topics.
Pre-requisite: PA 300
 
PA 410 Administrative Rules and Regulations
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course analyzes the authority and power of administrative agencies' adherence to law in the exercise of their administrative discretion formal relationship between the legislature, government executives and regulatory agencies. In addition, judicial review of administrative agencies will be studied. It will also examine how federal, state and municipal regulatory agencies issue rules and regulations and how these decisions impact on goals and objectives of administrative agencies and institutions. Pre-requisite: PA 360
 
PA 413 Public Program Evaluation
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This is a capstone course which interprets program planning, implementation and evaluation as integral elements for decision making and program authorization. It will emphasize the nuts and bolts of how to create an evaluation design and how to collect and analyze information in a way that will result in low cost and successful evaluations. Students will develop practical program evaluation skills to be placed in handbook formats so that they can use this information in applied research for conducting public policy studies. Pre-requisite: PA 300
 
PA 415 Policy Making and the Public Interest
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course spans the related disciplines of the political and the social sciences in an attempt to analyze and synthesize the respective inputs of each in the public policy making process. Various topologies are followed to provide students with the orientation to both descriptive and prescriptive approaches to policy-making in the public interest. Pre-requisite: PA 225
 
PA 440 Judicial Process and Court Systems
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course provides an exploration of the federal courts, state judicial systems, the role of law and lawyers in society, the impact of court and judicial systems on public policy, the decision-making patterns of actors in judicial process, the politics and economics of judicial process, the ideological orientations of the judiciary, the procedures of pretrial, trial, hearings, and appeals. This course also offers a well-grounded understanding of formal court structures and practices. Students will learn how judicial decisions have a great impact on society, not just in criminal and constitutional matters, but in civil law and related areas of dispute resolution. The course is not limited to the study of criminal or constitutional law. Civil law is also studied because civil cases far outnumber criminal cases and the impact on judicial process. Also, emerging trends in alternative dispute resolution, mediation, arbitration, and neutral fact-finding are studied. Pre-requisite: PA 365
Department of Public Administration
 
PA 450 Decision Making in Government Agencies
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course will analyze descriptive and normative approaches to decision-making processes resulting in modification of public agency structure, formation of goals and objectives, procedures, and devices for achieving same and for evaluating performance. Concepts of leadership are studied with attention to leadership patterns, their focus in the organization and the skills and abilities which they require. Pre-requisites: PA 300 and Permission of the chairperson
 
PA 480 Public Administration and Globalization
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course seeks to explain the genesis, nature and scope of globalization and its impact on public administration at the national and international levels. It will examine the various definitions, dimensions, and significance of the processes of globalization on national sovereignty, subsequently examine the responses of established bureaucracies to challenges brought about by globalization. It will query the re-design of state bureaucracies, their functions and styles in response to the fluidity of economic activities across traditional state borders. It will explore how information and technological innovations have deepened the globalization process and, simultaneously, articulate how the public administrative apparatus may be able to cope with the globalization phenomenon. Pre-requisite: PA 300 or Permission of the chairperson
 
PA 486 Global Public Policy
3 credits; 3 class hours
 
This course explores the efficacy of global public policy. It provides the students an opportunity to examine the emergence of a network of public, private, nongovernmental, national, regional, and international organizations that seek to provide an alternative framework for the behavior of states, businesses, nongovernmental and intergovernmental organizations throughout our world. The course will consider the origin and nature of current global transformation and its implication for public policy at the national level. The course will analyze economic globalization and examine the ramifications for national public policy as well as its impact on the future of sovereignty. Pre-requisite: PA 225
 
PA 490 Public Administration Internship (Capstone Course)
3-6 credits; 3-6 class hours
 
This course provides the future practitioner with an educational practice setting where he/she integrates all prior learning (knowledge, skills, attitudes and behavior) into a future style for professional practice. There is a seminar as well as field work component of the program. The scope and format of the field work component is semi-structured to provide sufficient flexibility in meeting the diverse educational needs and professional interests of each student. Students will have an opportunity to observe or participate in the practical aspects of administrative activities when they select one of several foci. Pre-requisite: Permission of the chairperson