ENGLISH

The English Department is a community of teachers, scholars and writers whose primary mission is to offer students an outstanding liberal arts education and the values of intellectual rigor and critical inquiry in an increasingly globalized and highly technological information-based society.

MISSION

The English Department is a community of teachers, scholars and writers whose primary mission is to offer students an outstanding liberal arts education and the values of intellectual rigor and critical inquiry in an increasingly globalized and highly technological information-based society.

Students may pursue a baccalaureate degree in English and an associate degree in liberal arts with a concentration in English. The department offers courses for the English major, composition and literature courses in the general education curriculum, ESL courses, and composition and critical literacy courses in the developmental education curriculum.  

English majors may concentrate in cross-cultural literature, creative writing or professional writing. By undergoing a course of study in one of these concentrations, students gain academic and cultural experiences that provide them with in-depth studies in literature and writing, enhance their intellectual, social and aesthetic awareness of their environment and develop their awareness of personal and civic responsibilities to the college, university, community and society in general.

At the end of the program, students will be able to gain employment in diverse fields such as teaching, publishing, professional writing and public relations and will also be prepared to undertake graduate studies in a range of professions including law, business, and medicine. In pursuit of its mission, the department is also committed to supporting faculty research, publication, and professional development.

ESL

The ESL Program, housed under the auspices of the English Department, offers two levels of ESL reading and writing courses (see detailed description below). Student placement is based on the students’ CUNY reading and writing test scores and handled by the college’s testing office.  The primary goal of this program is to provide our ESL students with a nurturing environment in which they acquire language skills through vigorous reading and writing activities. Upon completion of the upper-level reading and writing courses, ESL students are expected to be able to handle college-level reading, writing and mathematics materials with fluency and competence. 

MINORS

Candidates may seek a degree in the following areas:

Minor

Descripton

Requirements

EnglishStudents from business, sciences, and education often desire courses in English. The minor in English provides students in all disciplines with an opportunity to read, write about and interpret literary texts, and serves as a bridge for students who are interested in pursuing a BA in English. Students may pursue a minor in literature or a minor in writing.  Students who pursue the English minor will enhance their appreciation and understanding of English language and literature and will gain cache and mileage in the job market.Minor in English: Literature, 12 credits, 4 courses
WritingThe minor in English writing prepares students for careers in writing and communications.   Students take a cohesive choice of courses that provide them with increased competence in critical reading and writing and an in depth study of the writing process.  This minor is also targeted towards students who wish to publish their works.Minor in English: Writing, 12 credits, 4 courses
   
CONCENTRATIONS

The creative writing concentration at Medgar Evers College serves a niche student body that has been historically denied access to undergraduate writing programs which create the pool of candidates for graduate writing programs, literary careers and employment in the publishing industry and its ancillary industries such as magazine editing, book design and small press management.  Students in the creative writing concentration take a series of courses that serve both to augment the literary skills of students interested in the study of introductory creative writing and to embrace the increasing demands of students interested in pursuing advanced study in creative writing. 

The creative writing program at Medgar Evers reinforces the reputation of the College as a cultural leader in Brooklyn as well as the greater cosmopolitan area. This concentration provides an additional professional course of study for students considering Medgar Evers for their undergraduate studies.  A major goal of the creative writing program is to increase the number of students of color attending graduate school.  The program also enriches the faculty as well as the student life on campus with its ancillary events and activities and the wider activities it draws to the campus.  Faculty in the program also partner with the Center for Black Literature to produce programs that showcase students’ work in poetry, fiction and drama and that provide students with additional opportunities to study the craft of writing, to meet writers and poets and to engage in other creative writing activities.

Cross-Cultural Literature Concentration

The cross-cultural literature concentration with a specialization in the literature of the African diaspora provides students with an opportunity to study the literature of writers whose works are associated with more than one culture or whose works cross the boundaries of national cultures.  Students who study literature in this concentration examine cross- cultural influences in the work of particular writers with an emphasis on writers who come from various parts of the African diaspora.  The cross-cultural cultural concentration exposes students to literature in the African diaspora which may be beyond the boundaries of the nation or cultural group. Students are required to take 12 credits in African American Literature, African Literature, Asian American Literature, Black Women Writers or Latin American Literature.

Professional Writing Concentration

The Professional Writing Concentration provides a foundation of writing with a purpose for a specific audience. Its courses are designed to effectively prepare students for a variety of careers. Course offerings are open to both English majors and minors and are designed to meet the needs of those in other majors such as business and science.  English majors are required to take 12 credits in the Professional Writing Concentration.

BA DEGREE PROGRAM

The baccalaureate degree program in English combines a solid liberal arts background in the Humanities with the specialized skills needed to meet the growing demand for highly competent, high performing, and broadly educated individuals in an increasingly diverse society and workplace. Students are required to take 12 required courses in literature, 12 elective courses in literature, a course in literary theory, a course in applied linguistics, an intermediate composition course and a 12credit concentration of courses in creative writing, professional writing or cross-cultural literature. Students must also complete an internship and write a thesis-based on their concentration.

The distribution of literature courses is as follows. All English BA students must take at least one course in each of the sequences of American Literature I & II, African American Literature I & II, British Literature I & II and Caribbean Literature I & II, for a total of four courses. Literature electives include Literature of the Global City, Popular Fiction, Modernist Literature, Shakespeare and Special Topics in Literature. They may also fulfill this requirement with “core” literature courses.

In addition to the required four 300-level literature courses and literature electives, all English BA students take Applied Literary Theory (ENGL365) usually towards the end of their program. They also take Internship (ENGL 420), which introduces them to professional opportunities for English majors, and the Senior Thesis (ENGL422) which may expand upon a literary topic in which they have developed an interest or provide them with an opportunity to develop a manuscript in creative or professional writing.

This composition course emphasizes the critical and expository writing students will need throughout their college career. They will learn rhetorical skills, become fluent in academic discourse, and develop proficiency in the conventions of language through a series of writing assignments emphasizing the process of drafting and revision. They will learn how to synthesize primary and secondary sources and give proper attribution.  Their engagement with a wide variety of texts will broaden their global and cultural awareness and allow them to gain insight into themselves and their society.

This composition course continues the various types of critical and expository writing students will need throughout their college career. It emphasizes the process of conducting research, culminating in an MLA-formatted research essay. Using primary and secondary sources, students will analyze and gain understanding of multimodal texts in a range of disciplines. This course also introduces students to the interpretation and comparative analysis of literature of various genres and from diverse periods and cultures.

ENGL 208 is an introductory course to linguistics. Its primary focus is the application of linguistic theories illustrated by the broad use and application of linguistic knowledge in a variety of fields: education, politics and diplomacy, law, business, gender issues, and culture. The course focuses primarily on readings in the following linguistic categories: the relationship between language and thought, culture and gender, oral history and literacy, form and meaning, discourse analysis, and the nature of the various linguistic semiotic systems. Students are introduced to technical vocabulary and linguistic inquiry methodology.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150

This course will introduce students to various genres of childrens literature, including folklore, myths, picture books, poetry, and novels. Students will read, discuss, analyze, and critically respond to children's literature. Emphasis will be placed on reading literature representing diverse voices and on considering ways to integrate those voices into the traditional children's literary canon.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150

This is a writing course emphasizing selected essays by writers across cultures and times. Focus is on every aspect of the essay, including style, diction, theme, organization, and analysis of the role and function of the essay in different time periods and cultures. Students use these essays as models to construct their own essays and to improve their own skills as writers of essays, and consequently as writers in general.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 211

In this course, students will engage in critical readings of fiction, drama and poetry by authors of diverse cultures, nationalities and historical periods. Students will gain knowledge of literary terms and diverse theoretical perspectives, participate in discussions about selected works and write original essays involving close reading and research about literary topics. The course enables students to recognize a variety of approaches to analyzing literary texts, to reflect upon their own interpretations and to develop their skills in writing critically about literature.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150

This course is a survey of the evolving canon of world literature and will include selections of literature from around the world and from diverse time periods, ancient to contemporary. Students will locate these texts in a historical and cultural context and gain a sense of the development of, and connection between, literary texts across time and across cultures. Genres studied may include the epic, drama, poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and folktales.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150

Through a dual focus on their own and published writing, students are introduced to the skills needed in professional writing and publishing: writing, revision, editing, layout, and production. At the end of the semester, each student will submit one extensively revised piece for publication.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 112

The critical examination of a current topic relative to values, mores, cultures, ideas, arts, etc. Topics will be announced in advance.

Pre-Requisites: Permission of Chairperson

This writing workshop is designed for students to study the techniques of twentieth-century playwrights and to develop guided practice in writing for the stage. Students will also be required to evaluate their own work and the work of others in the workshop and to read and discuss five plays. Lectures and discussion on craft issues will include voice, structure, format, submission techniques, and the play development process.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150

The course is designed as a practical approach to planning, creating, and placing magazine articles. Students will strengthen their writing skills and gain experience writing articles, essays, interviews, and reviews for publication in both print magazines and online publications. Students will read and study different types of magazine writing, such as feature writing, reviewing, personal essays, and editorials with the aim of producing such works themselves.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150

This course consists of selected readings from major British writers and literary movements from the earliest forms through the 18th century.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 211 ENGL 316 British Literature II: 19th - 21st Centuries 3
Co-Requisites: 3 This course consists of selected readings from major British writers and literary movements from the 19th century to the present.
Pre/Co-Requisites: ENGL 211

This course presents selected readings from African American literature, oral and written, from the 17th century through the Negro Renaissance of the 1920s to 1932.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 211

This course presents selected readings from Black American literature, oral and written, from the Harlem Renaissance through the present.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 211

Beginning with Native American oral forms and continuing through the Civil War, this course explores principal authors, folklore, and literary movements as they reflect the heritage, legacy, and diversity of American culture.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 211

This course explores the development of American Literature from the Post Civil War period to the present. Principal authors, folklore, and literary movements as they reflect the heritage, legacy, and diversity of American culture are studied.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 211

This course consists of selected readings in travel narratives, fiction, poetry, autobiography, and drama from major authors and texts beginning with European representations of the colonial encounter in the Early Modern period and concluding with the literature and literary movements of the independence era.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 211

This course provides students with selected readings from the vast diversity of African voices from its early orator to its major modern figures. Students will examine some of the historical, political, social, and ideological forces that have helped shape African literature.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 211

This course consists of selected readings by major Caribbean authors in fiction, poetry, and drama from 1970 through the present. Emphasis is on the stylistic and thematic concerns of the literature as well as its relation to the physical, social, political, and intellectual landscape.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 211

This course examines 19th-and 20th-century Latin American literature, focusing on major works that represent important literary trends in Latin American literature and locating those texts within their historical, social, and cultural contexts.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 211

This course investigates some of the overarching themes that connect the literature produced in the postcolonial era in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and the Americas. Questions of economic dependency and marginalization, linguistic autonomy, and cultural hybridity are among the issues that will be explored through a study of literature and critical theory.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 211

This course will examine the literature of the modernist movement in English and in translation. It will cover the period between 1890 and 1940 on both sides of the Atlantic. Students will be given a broad overview of the major tenets of this movement as well as an in-depth study of some of its major works on the margins. Some focus will be given to works of the Harlem Renaissance.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 212

This course examines selected Shakespearean plays within the social, cultural, and political context of the Renaissance. A brief history of the development of the drama and a study of Shakespeares sources are included in the course.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 211

Using the skills learned in ENGL 260 or in previous publication experiences, students will work intensively on a group publication project to be published and distributed by the end of the semester. This practicum will include writing, production, layout, publicity, and distribution and requires the ability to work cooperatively and independently.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 260

This course provides students with an understanding of the great traditions of literary criticism. Students will explore their own literary interests and apply both historical and current methods of criticism to literary texts.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 212

Through selected readings, students will explore special topics in literature through the perspective of a unifying theoretical or thematic concept.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 211

Through selected readings, students will explore special topics in literature through the perspective of a unifying theoretical or thematic concept.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 211

Through selected readings, students will explore special topics in literature through the perspective of a unifying theoretical or thematic concept.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 211

This course of study centers on a project in the major concentration area, which incorporates content and depth not covered in regular course offerings. With the prior approval of a faculty supervisor, the student will undertake a project, which will constitute the semester's work. One weekly conference is required. (Option in art, English, Foreign-Languages, media, music, philosophy, speech.)

Pre-Requisites: Completion of 6, or the equivalent, in the major area of study with a grade of B or better and acceptance by a faculty supervisor.
Co-Requisites: Permission of Chairperson required Department of English

This course will allow students in the English BA degree program to undertake an in-depth study of a particular author or period, including close readings of major works, bibliographical and cultural information on the author or period.

Pre-Requisites: Permission of Chairperson

This first semester internship course provides an opportunity for upper-level students to apply their skills and knowledge in the workplace or in an organization related to their English concentration. Students are supported by weekly meetings with the coordinator and supervised by an internship site coordinator.

Pre-Requisites: Permission of Chairperson

This course of study centers on a project in the major area. With the prior approval of a faculty supervisor, the student will undertake a project, which will constitute the semester's work. One weekly conference is required.

Pre-Requisites: Permission of Chairperson