SOCIAL WORK AND BEHAVIOR

The English Department is a community of teachers, scholars and writers whose primary mission is to offer students an outstanding liberal arts education and the values of intellectual rigor and critical inquiry in an increasingly globalized and highly technological information-based society.

MISSION

Our mission is to provide students with the essential academic knowledge and skills necessary for rigorous undergraduate study, and subsequent entry into the graduate and professional schools and career advancement. The Department is committed to increasing the relevance and usefulness of the social and behavioral sciences to students, to other disciplines, and to the local community.

REQUIREMENTS

Students in the Department are expected to pass Social and Behavioral Sciences required Core courses with an index of 2.0 in his/her major grade of “C” or better. For graduation, a student must have an index of 2.0 in his/her major. 

MINORS

Candidates may seek a degree in the following areas:

Minor

Descripton

Requirements

EnglishStudents from business, sciences, and education often desire courses in English. The minor in English provides students in all disciplines with an opportunity to read, write about and interpret literary texts, and serves as a bridge for students who are interested in pursuing a BA in English. Students may pursue a minor in literature or a minor in writing.  Students who pursue the English minor will enhance their appreciation and understanding of English language and literature and will gain cache and mileage in the job market.Minor in English: Literature, 12 credits, 4 courses
WritingThe minor in English writing prepares students for careers in writing and communications.   Students take a cohesive choice of courses that provide them with increased competence in critical reading and writing and an in depth study of the writing process.  This minor is also targeted towards students who wish to publish their works.Minor in English: Writing, 12 credits, 4 courses
   
Associate of Arts in Liberal Arts

The Associate of Arts (A.A.) degree in Liberal Arts is designed to meet the needs of students seeking a strong two-year foundation in general education or completing two-year transferable degree requirements. More specifically, it meets the needs of students who are interested in political science, history, sociology, social work, anthropology and geography. Students who are undecided about their majors but interested in liberal arts are encouraged to enter this Program. The A.A. Degree in Liberal Arts requires the completion of 60 credits. 

Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies

The Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies offers a Liberal Studies degree program with a focus on the Social Sciences. There are three areas of concentration: History, Political Science, and Geography. The degree requires the completion of 120 credits. 

Bachelor of Science in Social Work (BSSW) Program

Medgar Evers College offers a Bachelor of Science in Social Work degree that prepares students for entry level positions in social work and for graduate school education. 
The program builds on a solid liberal arts foundation and provides a challenging generalist curriculum. It incorporates courses that focus on field practices, policies and services, and human behavior in the social environment. Social work courses are designed to impart knowledge and are aligned to comply with the standards for social work education as defined by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) Commission on Accreditation.

The overarching goal of the baccalaureate degree program is to graduate students who will demonstrate proficiency in the knowledge, ethical values and skills of the profession; be grounded in the profession’s history, purpose and philosophy; and practice social work in an ethical manner, helping to alleviate social and economic injustice as engaged socially responsible citizens in a rapidly changing world. 

The following are the admissions criteria for the Bachelor of Science in Social Work program:

  • Admission to Medgar Evers College
  • Completion of Core (Medgar Evers College) courses
  • Completion of 42 credits including Part A College Core and Part B Lower Level BSSW courses
  • Completion of all City University of New York (CUNY) requirements including placement examinations (ACT)
  • Cumulative GPA 2.5 at time of application to the Program
  • Written application to the Social Work Program which includes an admissions essay
  • Current copy of degree audit and all transcripts from other colleges if applicable
  • Individual interview with social work faculty
  • To remain in good standing in the Program, students must obtain a grade of C or better in all social work courses taken prior to and after admission
  • No Credit for Life Experience (CLEP) or CAEL will be considered

Bachelor of Science in Social Work (BSSW) Program Curriculum

In keeping with the standards established by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the Social Work Program is designed so that course work is progressive and integrated. Course sequencing is structured by pre-requisite and co-requisite requirements.
 
Pre-requisites are designed so that lower level courses provide a foundation for upper level courses. Co-requisites are designed to integrate and supplement courses taken concurrently. The social work curriculum is also designed to ensure that CSWE standards are met and that students graduate with the knowledge, skills and values of the social work profession. Medgar Evers College’s BSSW program has been accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

2016 Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes
MEDGAR EVERS COLLEGE BACCALAUREATE SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
This form is used to assist the COA in the evaluation of the program’s compliance with the accreditation standards below:
  • 4.0.2 The program provides summary data and outcomes for the assessment of each of its competencies, identifying the percentage of students achieving the benchmark.
  • 4.0.4 The program uses Form AS 4 (B) and/or AS4 (M) to report assessment outcomes to its constituents and the public on its website and routinely up-dates (minimally every 2 years) these postings

All Council on Social Work Education programs measure and report student learning outcomes. Students are assessed on their mastery of the competencies that comprise the accreditation standards of the Council on Social Work Education. These competencies are dimensions of social work practice that all social workers are expected to master during their professional training. A measurement benchmark is set by the social work programs for each competency. An assessment score at or above that benchmark is considered by the program to represent mastery of that particular competency.

COMPETENCYCOMPETENCY BENCHMARKPERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS ACHIEVING BENCHMARK
Identify as a Professional Social Worker80%95%
Apply Ethical Principles80%96%
Apply Critical Thinking80%100%
Engage Diversity in Practice80%100%
Advance Human Rights/ Social and Economic Justice80%100%
Engage Research Informed Practice/Practice Informed Research80%96%
Apply Human Behavior Knowledge80%96%
Engage Policy Practice to Advance Well-Being and Deliver Services80%89%
Respond to Practice Contexts80%94%
Practice Engagement80%96%
Practice Assessment80%100%
Practice Intervention80%96%
Practice Evaluation80%96%
2015 Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

MEDGAR EVERS COLLEGE BACCALAUREATE SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

This form is used to assist the COA in the evaluation of the program’s compliance with the accreditation standards below:
  • 4.0.2 The program provides summary data and outcomes for the assessment of each of its competencies, identifying the percentage of students achieving the benchmark.
  • 4.0.4The program uses Form AS 4 (B) and/or AS4 (M) to report assessment outcomes to its constituents and the public on its website and routinely up-dates (minimally every 2 years) these postings

All Council on Social Work Education programs measure and report student learning outcomes. Students are assessed on their mastery of the competencies that comprise the accreditation standards of the Council on Social Work Education. These competencies are dimensions of social work practice that all social workers are expected to master during their professional training. A measurement benchmark is set by the social work programs for each competency. An assessment score at or above that benchmark is considered by the program to represent mastery of that particular competency.

COMPETENCYCOMPETENCY BENCHMARKPERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS ACHIEVING BENCHMARK
Identify as a Professional Social Worker80%100%
Apply Ethical Principles80%100%
Apply Critical Thinking80%100%
Engage Diversity in Practice80%100%
Advance Human Rights/ Social and Economic Justice80%100%
Engage Research Informed Practice/Practice Informed Research80%94%
Apply Human Behavior Knowledge80%100%
Engage Policy Practice to Advance Well-Being and Deliver Services80%100%
Respond to Practice Contexts80%100%
Practice Engagement80%100%
Practice Assessment80%100%
Practice Intervention80%100%
Practice Evaluation80%100%


2014 Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes
MEDGAR EVERS COLLEGE BACCALAUREATE SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
This form is used to assist the COA in the evaluation of the program’s compliance with the accreditation standards below:
  • 4.0.2 The program provides summary data and outcomes for the assessment of each of its competencies, identifying the percentage of students achieving the benchmark.
  • 4.0.4 The program uses Form AS 4 (B) and/or AS4 (M) to report assessment outcomes to its constituents and the public on its website and routinely up-dates (minimally every 2 years) these postings

All Council on Social Work Education programs measure and report student learning outcomes. Students are assessed on their mastery of the competencies that comprise the accreditation standards of the Council on Social Work Education. These competencies are dimensions of social work practice that all social workers are expected to master during their professional training. A measurement benchmark is set by the social work programs for each competency. An assessment score at or above that benchmark is considered by the program to represent mastery of that particular competency.

COMPETENCYCOMPETENCY BENCHMARKPERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS ACHIEVING BENCHMARK
Identify as a Professional Social Worker80%100%
Apply Ethical Principles80%100%
Apply Critical Thinking80%100%
Engage Diversity in Practice80%100%
Advance Human Rights/Social and Economic Justice80%100%
Engage Research Informed Practice/Practice Informed Research80%89%
Apply Human Behavior Knowledge80%100%
Engage Policy Practice to Advance Well-Being and Deliver Services80%100%
Respond to Practice Contexts80%100%
Practice Engagement80%100%
Practice Assessment80%100%
Practice Intervention80%100%
Practice Evaluation80%100%

The course provides an overview of the origins of civilizations to the age of European exploration, including contributions of the great cultures of Africa, Europe, the Near and Far East, and The Americas. Emphasis will be placed on the religious, social, and political ideas and institutions of these cultures.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 112

Basic concepts in political science, including the nature of political power, definitions of basic terms; constitutional and behavioral approaches used in the study of political science.ENGL 112

The course introduces key concepts, themes, methodologies and tools of Geography. It defines Geography and discusses its importance and relationship to other sciences. The spatial variation in earth's environment, population growth, distribution, economic activities and their global interconnections are also discussed.

Pre-Requisites: None

The course begins with the age of European exploration and ends with contemporary societies. Emphasis will be placed on the rise of monarchies, political, economic and social revolutions, and the emergence of the Third World.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 112

The constitutional framework, of the U.S. political system, with special attention to relationship between cities, states, national government in the system; the relations between the Presidency, Congress, and the Supreme Court; the nature of the American political party system, and of the workings of interest groups; relationship between the American social, economic, and political systems; and contemporary issues in American government are examined.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 112 and POL 101

This course is an examination of the nature, function, and evolution of culture in Western and non-Western traditional societies. Family and kinship, religion, economic and political institutions are comparatively examined.

Pre/Co-Requisites: ENGL 112 and SSC 101

This course focuses on the political systems in selected nations in Western and Eastern Europe, systems in developing areas. It considers the impact of the economic system on that political system and vice versa and discusses political culture as a variant in comparative analysis.

Pre-Requisites: POL 101 and ENGL 112

This course explores early American History through the discussion and analysis of Original documents from the Mayflower to the Civil War. The dynamics in the development of early American History and society are explored in such documents as: The Mayflower Compact, Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, the US Constitution, the Dred Scott Decision and many others.

Pre-Requisites: HIST 101 or HIST 102 and ENGL 112

The critical examination of a current topic relative to values, mores, cultures, ideas, arts, etc. Topics will be announced in advance.

Pre-Requisites: Permission of Chairperson

This course examines the different lifestyles and characteristics of various neighborhoods, social class, race, ethnicity, culture, and other factors affecting urban environments will be discussed with special attention given to the multicultural nature of New York City.

Pre-Requisites: SOC 101 and ENGL 112.

This course covers the basis of relationships between nations; the role of region and world international organizations and of international law in international relations; basic considerations underlying the development blocs; theories of international system; contrasts between third world and major powers in regard to inception of international relations are examined.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150

Studies include emphasis on the federal system context and upon administrative and political decentralization, with special reference to the inner city; fiscal aspects of state, federal and local relationships, techniques for citizen influence on the political process. Especially in terms of needs of inner cities; problems of rural and "suburban" political power in relation to urban political power in relation especially the inner city.

Pre-Requisites: POL 200

This course will discuss the Black experience in the United States from 1619 to the Civil War. The origins of status duality in American society, and the contributions of Blacks in the making of America will be emphasized.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150

This course surveys the social, economic, cultural and political impacts of the Civil War and the Post Reconstruction Period on Afro American communities in America.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150

The colonial background to the independence struggle, the goals of the founding fathers, the Constitution and its evolution, westward expansion and interaction with aboriginal peoples, the Civil War and Reconstruction, slavery and emancipation, the growth of capitalism, trade unionism, populism, and education will be discussed.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 1

The growth of the economy, and power during the 20th Century; the internal problems of social justice, civil rights, urban development, and the impact of science and technology will be discussed. In general, the course will focus on the increasing complexity of American life and on the efforts made to cope with that complexity.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150

Studies include the emergence of a third world movement in the Post World War II period; the concept of non-alignment; impact of the third world movement on international politics generally and, upon the major powers in particular. Third world challenges to the prevailing assumptions of the international legal, political and economic systems are examined.

Pre-Requisites: POL 101 and ENGL 112

This is a survey of the development of the American foreign policy system from the revolutionary period to the present. Discussions will include the determinants of American diplomacy, idealism versus realism in American to reign policy, Monroe Doctrine, Manifest Destiny, expansion and the American empire. In addition, emphasis will be placed on America's rise from a hemisphere to a world power.

Pre-Requisites: POL 200

This course is a survey of African history from earliest times to the end of the 18th Century, including discussions of the people of Africa in the ancient world, the spread of Islam, and the kingdoms of the savannah and forest. Early European contacts with Africa and trade are studied.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150

This is the first of three social work methods courses. This course introduces the knowledge and skills of generalist social work practice including engagement, assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation, termination and follow-up. The empowerment and strengths perspectives, and social work values and ethics are applied to practice with clients of diverse racial, cultural, class and religious backgrounds. Focus is on micro practice with individuals and families.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150 and SW 220

This is a survey of the development of the Caribbean Islands and mainland countries of Guyana and Belize. It also deals with European conquest, slavery, emancipation, and political independence.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150

This is a study of selected aspects of the history of Europe. These aspects include the Roman, Christian, Islamic, and "barbarian" contributions to European civilization; the Renaissance and the genesis of the expansion of Europe; the consequences to European wealth and power of such expansion; the agricultural and industrial revolution of the 17th and 18th Centuries.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150

Major currents which have helped to shape modern Europe, including, but not limited to: political revolutions -English (1668), French (1789), and Russian (1917); the Industrial Revolution; 19th and 20th Century patterns of imperialism and the rise of the modern nation state. European international relations in the 19th and 20th Century will be addressed.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150

This course explores the development of cities from a historical perspective. An attempt is made to analyze the historical patterns that have led to the growth of cities into large metropolitan areas. The course will also examine the problems and prospects of the modern city. Case studies will be used where necessary to highlight Western and non-Western cities.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150

A study of the development of the American presidency. Focus will be upon the nature and theory of the executive branch and its relations with the other parts of government and society. Included will be selected cases or the expansion and deterioration of presidential power.

Pre-Requisites: POL 200 and ENGL 150

The course focuses on the analysis and explanation of spatial variations on the earth's surface of activities related to the production, exchange and consumption of goods and services using maps, models and generalizations. The activities are discussed under the headings; primary, secondary, tertiary, quaternary and quinary. The students will explore the dynamics associated with the selected activities and discuss their global interdependence.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150, GEOG 101 or GEOG 202 or Permission of chairperson

This course will deal with a broad range of "deviant" behavior with an emphasis on such behavior common to groups in our society. The legitimacy of the concept of "deviance" itself will be examined within the context of problems of socialization, norms, and the pressures of society. Salient topics are: drugs, social behavior, religion, politics, and crimes as they relate to deviance.

Pre-Requisites: SOC 101 and ENGL 150

The role of women in Western Society from the earliest times to the present is examined. Literary works by women as well as primary sources are utilized to assess the historical position of women including the opportunities available to them within their historical contexts.

Pre-Requisites: HIST 101 or HIST 102 and HIST 208 and ENGL 150

This course provides students with the opportunity to examine critical issues facing society today. Concerns such as gender and cultural diversity, racism, sexism, economic inequality, schooling, family related problems, criminal behavior, suicide, alcoholism, and ethical conduct will be emphasized. The critical approach to social problems shall be used as the preferred conceptual framework for analysis.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150 and SSC 101

This course is an introduction to the major sociological theories and their sociopolitical implications. Current sociological theory developments will be studied. Students will compare and evaluate the analytical and conceptual contributions of the sociological theorists.

Pre-Requisites: SOC 101 and ENGL 150

This course is designed to familiarize students with the disease, culture, and behaviors related to the HIV virus and AIDS. The course will also examine HIV transmission and prevention; including the how even small amounts of AOD reduces inhibitions, impairs judgment and increases the risk of potentially life-threatening behaviors. Also addressed with be the impact of HIV-AIDS on different populations groups (e.g., racial/ethnic groups, men and women, LGBT and the elderly).

Pre-Requisites: SW 301 and SW 302 and SW 337

This course will address AOD use as it effects different populations of various racial and ethnic groups, the disabled, LGBT, adolescents, the elderly and the homeless. Students will acquire an understanding of the effects of cultural, racial and ethnic similarities and differences. Key concepts and practices that encourage effective cross-cultural communication (counselor-client and staff-to-staff) in AOD counseling will be examined. NASW cultural competence issues will also be addressed.

Pre-Requisites: SW 310

This course will study the involuntary migration of African peoples to the Caribbean, Central, and South America. The major themes thathave helped to define the unique milieu of peoples of African descent in these societies will be addressed. Case study topics to be covered include responses to slavery by the African slaves, race and ethnicity, the survival of African cultures, Black Social Movements, and the role of Black peoples in the nation building process.

Pre-Requisites: HIST 101 or HIST 102 and HIST 208 and ENGL 150

This course will discuss the development, approaches, and accomplishments of Black Civil Rights Movements in the United States. Emphasis will be placed upon the growth of the radicalmilitant and the conservative leadership patterns in the Black struggle for social equality and justice in American society.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150 and HIST 200 or HIST 201

This course will examine a study of latent and manifest functions of the Police and Penal System, sources of community/police antagonism, and the nature and practices of crime control in the Criminal Justice System. In the area of Criminal Justice and Administration we will examine the social dynamics of those legal institutions (police, courts, and corrections) dedicated to dealing with criminal behavior and overall social control.

Pre-Requisites: SOC 101 or SSC 101 and ENGL 150

This course offers a study of selected U.S. Supreme Court decisions that have been influential in determining the applicability and meaning of the U.S. constitution. Emphasis will be placed on the historical development of the court, including judicial review and the role of the bench in such areas as civil rights.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150 and POL 101 or POL 200

This course presents the evolution to techniques for enhancing consumer protection; the legal right of the consumer; his/her awareness of these legal rights; the evolution of ombudsman techniques; the administration of the law.

Pre-Requisites: POL 101 or POL 200 and ENGL 150

The evolution of social service in the U.S. from the beginning of the century to the present will be studied. Specific references will be made in regard to the social welfare movement, covering such topics as the growth of settlement houses, social security, adoption, foster care and public assistance. The regulatory control exercised by federal, state, and municipal government in the area of social policy will be examined.

Pre-Requisites: SOC 208 and SOC 321

This course deals with major issues facing the local community, e.g. housing, the delivery of health and social services and education. The student should be involved as participant/observer in at least one of these areas.

Pre-Requisites: SW 220 and ENGL 150

This course deals with major issues facing the local community, e.g. housing, the delivery of health and social services and education. The student should be involved as participant/observer in at least one of these areas.

Pre-Requisites: SW 220, SW 230, and ENGL 311

This course offers an extensive review and a survey of Western political thought from Plato to Rousseau and Paine.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150 and POL 101 or POL 200

This course focuses on major contributions of political thought and theories of the modern slate from Rousseau to the present time, including such figures as Hegel, Marx, John Stuart Mill, Nietzsche, Fanon, Marcusc, and Dewey.

Pre-Requisites: POL 393

The course introduces basic concepts, themes and theories in Urban Geography and examines the historical evolution of cities, their contemporary location patterns, physical environment, transportation and land use dynamics. Development of housing, gentrification, urban ethnicity, intra urban migration, function, urban planning and problems are also analyzed with particular reference to the New York Metropolis and Borough of Brooklyn.

Pre-Requisites: GEOG 201 or 202

The subject matter to be discussed in the senior thesis should be identified by the junior year. Students are encouraged to choose topics that excite them and are drawn from their academic field and personal backgrounds. Students are expected to engage in some primary research and original analysis and interpretation. The thesis is due the 3rd week in November for January graduates and the 3rd week in April for June graduates.

Pre-Requisites: SSC 403

This course will provide an intensive study of the historical roots, development, influence, ideology, and total function of the church in the Black community in America. The role of religion as an instrument of protest, escape mechanism, emotional outlet, focal point of political organizing and of social life will be analyzed.

Pre-Requisites: SOC 340

This course is a comparative study of slavery in selected countries illustrating the peculiarities of the laws, treatment, and use of slaves, and progress toward emancipation in the various systems (Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, French, American, and British).

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150 and HIST 201

This course explores techniques of community organization with an emphasis on metropolitan ghettos, senior citizens, and youth programs. Community development, community planning, and community action-organizational models will be examined.

Pre-Requisites: Permission of the Chairperson