Philosophy and Religion

The study of philosophy fosters critical, analytic reasoning skills that are part of the intellectual armament of an educated person. Its successful student will be a tough-minded thinker who is able to devise for him/herself a consistent worldview in which knowledge from other disciplines and knowledge from life experiences are put together into a coherent system.  The mission of the Department of Philosophy and Religion is to educate students to be leaders and engaged citizens who are committed to creating positive change and who are able to successfully pursue a number of rewarding roles and careers.

The study of philosophy will also acquaint students with the great ideas that have been central in the development of human culture over the past 25 centuries. However, philosophy is not simply a collection of doctrines. Rather, it is a set of great controversies over fundamental questions such as the nature of mind, the meaning of truth, knowledge, and value and the method of conceptual analysis we use to clarify the terms of our thinking about these questions.

Students must meet all requisite CUNY proficiencies. A minimum of sixty (60) credits is required for the A.A. in Liberal Arts. Students are required to adhere to all course guidelines and requirements as set forth in departmental syllabi.  Students in the Department must pass Philosophy and Religion’s required Core courses with a grade of “C” or better. For graduation, a student must have an index of 2.0 in his/her major.

This course provides the critical analysis and intellectual examination of leadership. The course is designed to integrate and synthesize various leadership modalities through open discussion, honest self assessment, experiential exercises, and participatory observation of real life leadership in practice.

Pre-Requisites: REL 101

This course is designed to introduce students to some of the central aspects of African Traditional Religion(s) presented in selected, influential studies by African scholars of religion. Utilizing interdisciplinary and multi-methodological approaches, we will examine the profile of religious plurality in Africa and pursue reading in the literature of the field.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150

Students will engage in philosophical reflection on a range of questions that arise from the experiences of black people in the United States and throughout the African Diaspora. Topics to be covered will include the complexities of black identity, theories of racism, the significance of Africa and its Diaspora, gender and sexuality, and the role of the arts in black liberation struggles.

Pre-Requisites: PHIL 101

This course is designed as an historical and geographical overview of the religious traditions of South and East Asia. Emphasis will be placed upon identifying and understanding the themes of renunciation and popular practices throughout the various religions of Asia. Students will also discuss definitions of religion in order to facilitate their understanding of religious traditions that are not their own.

Pre-Requisites: REL 111 and ENGL 150

This course explores the significance of religious symbols for human self-understanding and cultural values in selected religious traditions, such as Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Native American traditions. The course raises questions related to human identity, religious symbol, and cultures.

Pre-Requisites: REL 111 and ENGL 150

The primary purpose of this course is to explore classical issues in the philosophy of religion, such as the reality of God, the problem of evil, religious language, life after death, and the pluralism of religious traditions. Discussion focuses on proofs for and against the existence of God and various critiques and defenses of religious belief in general. The course will also explore how the claims of European thinkers translate into the African-American experience of religion.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150 and REL 101

This course on Peace Education will introduce students to the historical development of peace education as a field of study and as a discipline. Students will examine the contemporary discourse on peace education and the current trends and perspectives that permeate the literature. Students will also explore some of the definitions articulated by various cultures in order to establish a conceptual framework for what it means to educate for peace.

Pre-Requisites: REL 101 and ENGL 150

This course is designed to deepen student understanding of how religion serves as an epistemological foundation for moral reasoning and action. Religious texts and communities are presented that show how differing moral communities have justified their ways of life to themselves and others in their quests for societies of virtue, responsibility, freedom and duty.

Pre-Requisites: PHIL 201 and ENGL 150

This course is designed to introduce students to some of the central aspects of African Traditional Religion(s) presented in selected, influential studies by African scholars of religion. Utilizing interdisciplinary and multi-methodological approaches, we will examine the profile of religious plurality in Africa and pursue reading in the literature of the field.

Pre-Requisites: ENGL 150